Thursday, June 13, 2013

Light summer reading!



Finally catching up with my kids and am reading Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment.

I highly, highly recommend it. Dostoevsky's timeless understanding of the human heart and the human condition is astounding. And what a story teller!


Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1821-1881


My admiration for those great minds who have come before us knows no bounds.

Next up, Brothers Karamazov!



UPDATE: For another great summer reading idea, check this out!


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21 comments:

  1. I have never read Crime and Punishment, but it doesn't sound light! If this is "light reading", what do read for frivolous reading? :-)

    Sort of joking of course!

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  2. I'm afraid to take book recommendations from you! LOL If you are reading it, I know I can't handle it! LOL

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  3. I love anything written by Dostoevsky! Also try Michener....other than the apologetics that I'm currently reading the fiction for the summer is Kristin Lavransdatter.

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  4. Becky, ha ha! The "light" was definitely tongue-in-cheek! But you know, it is not really as bad as I thought it would be. I have been intimidated for years, but it's fairly easy to read!

    Sew, ha ha! Silly girl, you'd love it!!

    Catholic Grammie, I ADORE the Kristin Lavransdatter trilogy!

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  5. I just read Kristin Lavransdatter this past winter and LOVED it. The only problem was I got so engrossed in it that by the end I caught myself praying for Kristin's intercession....ooopps! I want to the same author's book on Catherine of Sienna.

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  6. GOA, ha ha! And, Sigrid Undset wrote a book on Catherine of Sienna????

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  7. PS: The funny thing about reading Great Books and classical stuff is that you realize that human nature does not change and we are not morally "evolving" as a species. It has ever been thus. Reading C and P, reading Augustine's Confessions, even reading the parable of Christ… we see ourselves and those we love. Same issues, same nature, same sins, same hopes, same humanity. So, secularists who scoff at previous generations, feeling they are not as wise or as intelligent as we are, really just need to become more well-read. ;)

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    1. *parables

      Wish there were an "edit" button on blogger, sigh.

      Oh, and the socialists/atheists in C and P (150 year ago) are arguing the same things vs. the Christians that we hear today: Utopian future, enlightenment to come, moral evolution, state takes care of folks equally, no need for the shackles of religion, etc., etc. The same!

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  8. I have tried to read Crime and Punishment but it was so depressing I had to stop and put it down. My husband has read both Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov and really liked them both.

    Light summer reading? You're funny.

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  9. Leila, Confessions was one of the major hair pin turns in my reversion for exactly the reason you mentioned. I assumed the anciant writer had very limited insight because of the age they were born into, only to find out the opposite. Augustine proved to me that not only did he deal with exactly the same issues as us, but also that his generation didn't have as many distractions and didn't have this shallow, microwave attention span which allowed them far deeper thoughts. I've often said reading that book seemed like reading a modern 43 yr old, NY, Ivy League marketing exec only ten times smarter and open minded. Imagine if that book or City of God was mandatory reading for college . We wouldn't have nearly the arrogant close-minding attitude that you see today.

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  10. lol, okay, I admit it might be a little depressing at some parts! :)

    My kids have been discussing it in my home amongst themselves for years (they read it in tenth grade) and were pushing me for years to read it. Now I feel like I can be part of the conversations (well, after I read Brothers K, too).

    I am way behind on the classics, but we have sort of made this a theme this summer I guess. One son is reading East of Eden by Steinbeck, after just finishing Brave New World. I have read neither, ha! It beats having them sit around playing video games all day and makes Mom feel good. :)

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  11. I'm reading Brothers K this summer, too! Happy reading!

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  12. Dostoevsky is amazing! The Brothers Karamazov is a particular favorite of mine. I strongly recommend reading Solzhenitsyn as well.

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  13. Frank, that is awesome! MaryMargaret, yes, I think I will be hooked on Russian authors and will have to move to Solzhenitsyn next. :)

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  14. Brothers K is a marvel. You MUST read Tolstoy's short stories. Father Sergius, Master and Man, Hadji Murad. My heart soars just thinking about those wonderful stories. The Russian authors who write hernia inducing tomes very often write FABulous short stories too.

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  15. Cancer Ward is an amazing book..but really sad. Worse than Crime and Punishment, because no one is guilty. Russian authors rock..they just have a philosophical bent.

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  16. East of Eden is absolutely my favorite Steinbeck! You have to read it for the Cain and Abel analogy that "haunts " the family. And once you have finished with Dostoevsky 's works and start in with Solzhenitsyn - you will discover that you'll have to read everything he wrote. Then you really need yo read Michener's The Source (if you haven't already)

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  17. Jamie and MaryMargaret, I will do that! And, Catholic Grammie, my husband read and loved The Source!

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  18. Oh what timing, Leila! I read that book just about this tie of year while I was at the beach. As powerful as the book is, it is SOOOO NOT enjoyable beach reading (in my opinion)! I feel I did both the beach and the book a disservice by trying to blend them into that one week.

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  19. sweet jane, ha! I will makes sure to finish before we hit the beach (I am soooo close to being done). I read most of it in the mountains, and it seemed just right there among the pines. Now, I am home and it's harder to get the quiet time to read.

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