Thursday, August 8, 2013

Just curious: What do you do for a living?



So many wonderful friends and readers on this blog! Intelligent, thoughtful people with varied viewpoints, from all walks of life, and even residing on several continents!

But I don't think I've ever asked you folks: What you do for a living? 

Or, if you don't work for a paycheck, what did you do before you had a family or before you retired (or were laid off)? What is your trade or area of expertise? What are your gifts?

Tell us as much or as little as you'd like, and for you private types, I will allow anonymous commenters, at least until a troll strolls in. 

I want to hear from regular commenters and lurkers alike!

As for me, I have a bachelor's in English, and I am a writer. I think I was born a writer, frankly, but I'm not a creative writer, nor a novelist, nor can I teach writing to save my life. I haven't made a living by writing (though I've been paid for it now and then), but I did work as an editor and media coordinator at a small direct marketing company for a short time in my early twenties. I chucked that for the chance to live my dream of being a wife and mom. And go figure, I still write, but not in a way I ever could have imagined!

*Added: My husband is a regulatory and government affairs consultant. He started his own one-man company a couple of years ago. He's worked in government (ran a state agency, and very efficiently I might add!) as well as in non-profit and private business. His areas of expertise are energy, taxation, and economic development. 

Okay, go! What do you do?




204 comments:

  1. Well, I'll answer first, since I Happened to pop over to use your Amazon link!

    What do I do? Take care of my kids, and lately, my father, too. For money, I am blessed to be able to work part time from home as the biller for my brother-in-law's medical practice. I started that job five years ago and it still makes me sad to put anything but "mom" in the blank for occupation on my taxes, so for now, I keep putting "mom". I could add grandmother, too. I think I will next time! :)

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  2. Jack-of-all-trades, master of none. Enough schooling for three majors: Russian/Psychology/Biology - B.S. degree, teaching license for Biology and Language Arts at the secondary level (which I've done for years, and yes, I've also taught mathematics on an emergency license). I've also taught Signed English. Constantly learning - hoping to get into Nursing School at this late date in my life....mom, grandmother, rosary maker, bibliophile....

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  3. Stay at home with the kiddos! Also, I sell Pampered Chef now because I LOVE to cook, and I used to teach HS English... now I get to teach people to cook great means AND I don't have to grade. Win-win.

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  4. Until I brought my babies home, I was an nurse. Worked brief stints in Med-Surg, Otolaryngology but mostly in L&D. Hubby is a software architect and part-time iOS developer.

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  5. I don't know if I'm a sufficiently regular commentator here to count, but I'll post anyway. :-p

    By way of paying the bills, I'm a grad student getting my Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Kansas. Right now I'm at the "end"(-ish) of my dissertation. I've completed my coursework and now I'm in the throes of writing my dissertation. I teach two college classes of about 35 kids per semester (this year I'm teaching Logic & Critical Thinking; I've taught Social & Political Philosophy and Intro to Philosophy before too). I *love* teaching!
    Definitely my favorite part of the job (writing I'm okay at but I don't love it the way I do teaching).

    By way of vocation, I'm a husband of ~4 years and a father of 3 (James is ~3, Joy is ~1, and Gabe is 3 weeks old). We had a miscarriage in there that I don't think about much because it makes me sad.

    I read voraciously, enjoy biking (but no time of late), and play computer games with my wife. I've been reading some conservative thinkers of late to try and figure out what conservatism is. (I realized I could give a good explanation of the tenets of political liberalism but not political conservatism.) That's probably more than you ever wanted to know but there it is. :-p

    Sincerely,
    ~Benjamin

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    1. Your note prompted me to add that I want to hear from everyone, not just regular commenters! Thanks, Benjamin!

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  6. Former TV reporter, anchor, producer. Which equips you to do a whole lot of nothing when you decide not to be that any more. Except for public relations, which I hate. So I'm so, so glad I now get to do what I really love, being a stay-at-home mom :)

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    1. Karey, I interned for a short time at our local news station so your job is really interesting to me! I never went anywhere with it, but media still fascinates me. :-)

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  7. I am a bank operations manager/officer. I have always been in financial services operations departments. I like to develop people so I have taken a strong liking to the people management part of my job.

    My husband is a table games lead supervisor at a casino.

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  8. I have had many different jobs but the one I keep coming back to is nursing assisting. Problem with being a nursing assistant is that as you grow older, people just assume you're using it as a stepping stone to become a nurse. But for me, I love the bedside care, which is the sole duty of a nursing assistant.

    I am a SAHM for now. I had to quit after my heart attack b/c health issues were interfering with my job. Plus I had my 5th baby! My plan is to stay at home with the kids for at least another year and then hopefully get my nursing assistant certificate renewed and work in hospice care. To help out a little with the bills, I have my etsy shop where I make clay rosaries.

    My husband is a machinist and a great handy-man around the house!

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  9. I'm the Coordinator of Marriage and Family Life for our diocese (a teacher by training, called by God to this job). I am actually just getting ready to start a graduate degree program in Theology with a Concentration in Moral Theology from Holy Apostles.

    The Man is the Coordinator of the Massage Department (and a medical massage therapist himself) at a Rehab/Fitness Center. Yes, it is fabulous to be married to a massage therapist. I don't get lots of massages, but when I do they are a.ma.zing!

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  10. Previous career - I worked on prototype vehicle builds for a major corporation- engineering changes and materials/parts changes.

    I'm "mama" now. Jackpot.

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  11. By trade, I am an electrical engineer (completed my masters in EE this past May!) but my job title is Systems Engineer. You may be wondering what a systems engineer does? As many of my colleagues and I fondly describe our work, "We herd cats all day!" :-) By that we mean we manage the technical development of communication systems, making sure all the engineering disciplines on our projects (hardware, software, mechanical, etc.) design the correct pieces of the system to fit together as a working product.

    I am also a husband to an amazing wife of 2 years and the proud father of a 15 month daughter!

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  12. Previous career: Naval officer
    Current career: Wife and mother
    Periodic career: Teacher

    I have prior experience in middle school math and science with some long-term subbing in there for good measure. I'm licensed for K-6 with a middle school math endorsement, I've finished with the requirements for a middle school science endorsement, and I'm one course shy of a middle school Algebra 1 endorsement. I'm about to be the part-time middle school math teacher at a local Catholic school which still gives me plenty of time for my primary vocation of wife and mom.

    Life is good! :)

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  13. I'm a hospital pharmacist. When I say that, most people reply "I didn't know hospitals had pharmacists!"

    But yes, my hospital has about two dozen pharmacists, and we do things like calculate antibiotic doses, counsel patients about new meds they'll receive at discharge, check for drug interactions, notify MDs if their patient has a contraindication to a medication, ensure that patients' home meds are continued in hospital, and generally ensure that all our patients get exactly the meds they need; no more, no less. :)

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  14. I'm a writer, homeschool teacher, and stay at home mother to 6. My husband is a graphic designer. I used to work as a public interest lawyer but then I became a Roman Catholic at age 27. Nothing like receiving Jesus on a weekly basis to screw up my formally "all about me" career plans.

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  15. I currently work in the legal department of a Fortune 500 company managing the legal reporting requirments of its US subsidiaries. I stayed home for a bunch of years before that. I'm blessed to have a female boss with her own little ones so she totally "gets" the endless working mom juggle.

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  16. I went to school and got a B.S. in Animal Science, but ended up working credit for 11 1/2 years. For the last 4 years, I have worked for my Dad doing farm audits. I'm also a 7th grade catechist - eek, for 5 years now.

    My husband works for a large nutritional supplement company in the Quality Assurance Dept.

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  17. I used to be an accountant's assistant. Now, I am a full time stay at home mama to one super cute and sweet 4 month old. My husband is an Independent Contractor, Coordinator of Religious Education at our parish and free lance writer for our Diocesan newspaper.

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  18. I have a B.A. in English with a minor in Technical Writing, and I work as an editor for a large global information company (6,000+ employees worldwide). It's hard to explain everything I do, but it mostly deals with document conversion (PDF -> HTML, primarily). It's boring as heck but it pays the bills, and the company itself is a good place to work.

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  19. School teacher for a while, then 30 years in retail, commercial and corporate Banking, and Training. Dropped out of the high-flying, high-stress, corporate sector after a couple of years of chronic depression followed by major cardiac surgery and a sudden life changing conversion. Now I survive on a pittance, look after my 87 y.o. mother (when she's not looking after me! :)), make Catholic videos, teach Catechism to kids in a government school, write and speak Truth in various fora, extend a shoulder to cry on for anyone who needs one, pray, study and work to grow in grace and wisdom, and generally enjoy "making a mess" in the world around me, as my namesake on a public bus in Rome might put it! Just like so many of you here are also doing!

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  20. I am an Intellectual Property Paralegal working for a specialty chemical company. At this time, I am also going to school to get a BS in Chemistry.

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  21. English SAHM and carer for my Grandma. Prior to that various office jobs, mostly with doctors and also for Postgraduate Dean of Medical Studies at a University. Have a BSc Hons in psychology. Fascinated by theology. Would love to write for a living. Love being a mum.

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  22. I have a BA in Human Development and Family Resources and a Master's in Library and Information Science. My last day as a librarian was Valentine's Day of this year- my daughter, Jacinta Marie, was born on February 15th and I have been a SAHM every since. My husband works in the service department at a John Deere dealership.

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  23. Funny you should ask this since it relates to how I blog. I’m Solutions Development Manager (fancy way of saying a Technical Product Manager). I’m also the program leader for a logic method for problem solving and decision making.

    Often times we do not have all the facts or evidence we would like to solve a problem or make a decision, but we are not allowed to “guess”. We have a systematic process of moving toward what is more reasonable and away from what is less reasonable. You might say it’s about finding truth, and it has helped me to see the clear thinking found in Catholicism. Some aspects are found in our blog.

    This post has a way to describe the problem of sin in a way you may not have seen before:
    http://2catholicmen.blogspot.com/2012/07/message-of-hope.html

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    1. You are right, Ben!! That is unique! I just love it! I think the technically-minded men on this blog will especially love it! And this line to me is so good:

      You will NOT love a God you do not know, and you will NOT serve a God you do not love.

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  24. Previously, I was the Dir of Youth and Young Adult Ministry at a large DC area parish. Now, in between chasing and feeding toddlers, I am starting an organization that will partner with non-profits to help them fundraise. I just recently resigned my teeny tiny position as music director of my parish (had a small stipend), but I still volunteer with the high school ministry.

    Of course, nothing I'm currently doing makes any money. Thankfully, my husband is a genius in computer programming, so I get to flutter around without worrying about how we'll pay the bills...

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    1. Flutter around had me cracking up!!!!!

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  25. I managed group homes for adults with disabilities, about 6 clients and 16 staff members who I was responsible for. BIG BIG job :)

    Now I stay at home with my 2 year old twins. My husband works on oil rigs to support the fam!

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  26. I'm an udergrad in Biology, and sometimes get paid to do labwork. My husband is a software engineer who graduated with a degree in Chemistry. Adding "and I'm growing a baby" to my daily list of things I do makes me feel more accomplished (which is necessary for sanity right now, given that morning sickness made me miss a lot of lab work).

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  27. I am loving this! You guys are fascinating! I keep checking for more!

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  28. I'm a regular lurker to your blog. I've been a homemaker since my first child was born five years ago. Before that, I worked as a prosecutor in one of the smaller counties in Arizona. I intend to resume my career on a limited basis once my youngest child turns three. I'll probably work as a contract dependency attorney (CPS cases). My husband worked as a prosecutor in the same office (we met at work) until a few months ago (switched over to the other side).

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  29. I'm a stay at home mom now, and couldn't be happier. Previously, I worked as an operations/administrations manager for a small business that does government contracting in the intel community (tech side). Before that, I taught a college prep course to 9-12 graders at a defense school overseas. I have a bachelor's degree in Russian, which sadly, I haven't used in years. For 6 years, I was also a member of the armed forces (intel , but the human side this time). I love to read, like a lot of different things, but wouldn't say I have any great strengths in any particular area. Except maybe as family mediator ;). I'm definitely a people person, although I prefer one on one to large groups. I think if I were inclined to start another career (I'm not), I would be a nutritionist.
    My husband and I met during our military service (both in the same MOS (military occupational specialty)), and he went on to do more technical intel and also worked with me at the same small business doing sales and product development. He now runs a cyber security training academy for the defense department (as a civilian). And probably within the year will start up a new company. He's the jack of all trades of the family - a musician, woodworker, locksmith, videogame developer and pinball machine restorer, as well as pretty much the best handyman a wife could ask for. Plus, he's a born teacher and a great mathematician!

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  30. I'm also a regular lurker, and *sometimes* comment. :)
    I am currently a Ph.D student specializing in Medieval English literature, and looking forward to continuing my scholarship on Chaucer and the sacraments. I wrote my master's thesis on Chaucer's later work and his use of/encounters with the sacrament of penance. As part of my doctoral work, I teach writing to undergrads.

    I've also done a brief stint as a copyeditor and writer at a local firm.

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    1. One Ph.D. student to another here: How far along in the process are you? ABD? Have you done your comps yet or are you still doing coursework? (I'm ABD and I have 4 semesters of funding left; so I guess I'll be done sometime in the next 4 semesters!) :-p

      Sincerely,
      ~Benjamin

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    2. Hi Benjamin,
      I've just seen your reply--sorry for such a late response! I'm actually just beginning my doctoral work this Fall, having just finished my MA. Good luck finishing up!
      --KJL

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  31. I work as a Business Systems Analyst in the IT department of a chemical company. Basically I figure out what the busiess wants/needs the software to do and translate it into "geek speak".

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  32. I am a lawyer. Worked for a couple of years after graduating and then stopped two months before my first son was born. After that I decided to stay home to take care of him. Now I have three kids and take care of all of them. I'm happiest doing this :D

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  33. I'm a physical therapist, which is a truly fantastic job in my opinion. (Except the paperwork, that'll be the death of me.) Most PT's graduating in the last 8 or so years have our Doctorate in Physical Therapy. I am a complete geek about body mechanics and I love the puzzle of figuring out how to get people moving again or moving better with less pain. We do get a chance to help people get back to their lives after major illness and injury, but I wish more people understood how much physical therapy can do to help people live their lives and do their activities more efficiently and with less pain! I love when I get to help people do something they love and they're no longer having pain.

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  34. Stay at home mom of 5 boys. Worked as a lawyer in a insurance company and quit when my firstborn came. Also have a master of Education in training and development. With my husband founded a law firm in which he works since 1996, sometimes I help a little.
    Now that my little one is in preschool, I'm begining to do prolife work. Leila i took your advice, thank you so much !! I have great news to tell you!!

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  35. I am in-house counsel and the head mortgage underwriter for a regional Credit Union Servicing Organization. How many people fell asleep reading that sentence?

    Many Credit Unions do not have enough resources to have a full mortgage department. So they hire us to produce the documents and do a lot of the back-office stuff. My job as an underwriter means I review the loan files to make sure the borrower is able and willing to repay the loan and the property has enough value to secure our loan. If you have any experience with underwriters it was probably a bit negative because we are the ones that come back and say "We need more bank statements! We need more pay stubs!" (Sorry)

    As an attorney, I am the hired gun they go to with any and all random legal questions....and trust me they are random. Before this I worked as a wills and estate and elder law care attorney. Being a company lawyer is a lot more fun.

    My husband is a manager of one of the departments at a local plant. He works so many hours now that I also was promoted to head chef and laundress extraordinaire! (Boo! :-)

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  36. In my previous career I worked at a domestic violence shelter, ran a crisis hotline/walk-in center, and worked for the mental health department. More recently I've been a lawyer (but don't take that the wrong way).

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  37. Never comment, but I follow you on Facebook, Leila. I taught HS English and then did part-time gigs at community colleges for about 15 years. Then I was fortunate enough to get a job with an online education provider which allowed me to work from home. I manage curriculum development projects and do some instructional design. My co-workers are a creative, quirky bunch, and I do love them, but sometimes I wish I could just focus on my homemaking.

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  38. I was a SAHM homeschooling mom for 20 years, then with the divorce had to rethink everything. Have continued homeschooling, work privately as a tutor and now am also a Tax Preparer for H&R Block, funny thing is I really enjoy it all!

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  39. I work part-time in public accounting doing taxes, financial audits, bookkeeping, fun stuff. But my joy is my five beautiful babies!

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  40. I might be the dumbest person to respond! Haha

    I never went to college.

    I was a flight attendant which was my dream job! But not in a dream job way, i just wanted it and got it! ever since the age of 8 i always wanted to fly. it was labor intensive and I was poor.

    I waited a ton of tables and had such a great time! I would wait tables again I loved it!

    Laid off due to 9/11 and was hired as a supervisor for the new government agency of Homeland Security...then I worked my way up to work in an operations center. Get this-I wrote security threat reports while monitoring aviation threats. Ha! Me writing!? I made a great salary for my education level!

    Then I worked in cotton commodities after I was married! Had a great time-had no idea what I was doing. I seemed to bs my way through it. I faked it through all of my jobs.

    Now I'm a full time mother and it is the only job I work very hard at and it's the only job that has fulfilled every ounce of my being! And wife....full time wife! Lol. The only time in my life I'm not faking being at "work"!

    My first and favorite job ever was bagging groceries. I have no idea why, I just remember being really good at it and had a great time. Who isn't good at bagging groceries?! Haaaaaa!!! I kid you not, I love it when no one is available to bag my groceries!

    So amongst the elite professions stated above..there you have it!

    Phone won't let me make any corrections.... :(

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    1. At my grocery store I have learned that not everyone bags groceries well. ;)

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    2. It's true! Not everyone bags groceries well. I had a young man at my local grocery store who would consistently try to put the hot roasted chicken in the same bag as and on top of my ice cream. Every time, I had to tell him not to do that. Seriously.

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    3. Cheer up. He was thinking somewhat, or it could've been worse. He could've put the ice cream on top of the hot chicken! Ever tried roast chicken with chocolate topping? Now there's an idea!

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  41. Haven't commented here in a while but I still read your blog every week:) I'm an optician at a private practice eye doctor. Praying about become a FOCUS missionary after I get married in a couple of years, which I would do with my to-be husband. Gotta wait til he finishes school first:)

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  42. I have a BS in Family Studies and Human Development and an MA in Elementary Education. I was a teacher for 9 years before becoming a SAHM at the end of this past school year - a dream come true! I'm 2 months and 2 babies into my vocation and hope to add many months (well, actually years) and babies to that total! :)

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  43. I started out with a BA in Psychology but never went on to get the planned doctorate. Took a detour into Seminary, got my MDiv, and was ordained a Lutheran pastor. Served parishes for 30 years mostly in PA. My husband and I (he also was ordained) raised 4 children and wereactive in our communities as well as congregations. Kids are grown and on their ownn. We have one grandson --so far! -- We both retired from the ministry and resigned our ordination 3 yrs ago in order to come home to the Catholic Church as lay folks. Both active in our parish teaching, bring Eucharist to the hospitals, etc. Hubs just got a job from our Diocese as a Cathloic Chaplain at local university university and college. We spent 2-1/2 years growing and losing a photography business. I continue to work part time at a fabric store, and I keep our home. Am still looking for a church or a non-profit leadership job.. Or to be called into fulltime Grandma service!

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    1. In case you don't know about it; this is a great website for people interested in Catholic psychology!
      http://ipsciences.edu/

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  44. I'm a regular lurker, too. I'm currently a homemaker with 3 young daughters (oldest just turned 5). In my previous career, I earned a PhD in computer engineering and did some consulting work.

    Every time I get ready to comment I get pulled away by my little ones. By the time I get back, usually someone else has already addressed what I was going to far more eloquently than I could! Thanks to all who make the time to engage in these great discussions!

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  45. I have my bachelor's in physics and did various research assistant jobs with that, then taught high school math and physics for a year, and now I'm a mom! In my spare time, I'm a birth doula. :-) DH is a lawyer.

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  46. There you go, dear Leila. Looks like you've been able to expose a marvellous cross section of respectable middle America. How I wish there was a way to force the powers-that-be to address the needs and aspirations of these good people, instead of pandering to the demands of fringe dwellers, anarchists, lunatics and the elite, who, in recent years, have so comprehensively hijacked the West's socio-political agenda. What a mighty force for genuine good such people, effectively organized, could make! Makes me salivate at the very thought of it!

    What I also found to be quite telling about this group is how many of the ladies have written about their happiness at finally becoming SAHMs after having flirted with financially rewarding careers outside the home. Given all the radical feminist indoctrination of the culture these days, I wasn't really expecting to hear that! God bless 'em all!

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    1. I agree with your last paragraph!

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  47. Great idea for a post! I loved reading about all the occupations!!

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  48. Oh how I long to be a SAHM! It's a hard job but the best one to have. I, however, have two jobs. I'm a Mother to 2 children (and hopefully more if that's God's will) and I am a lead fundraiser for a major public research university. I help donors change lives through their philanthropy. It's exceptionally rewarding and gratifying work.

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  49. I'm a regular/pretty-much-addicted-to-your-blog lurker, occasional commenter and emailer (my maiden name is Mascarenhas- that's the name in my email address).
    I have a Bachelors of Engineering in Computer Science (graduated 2011) and worked for about a year for a multinational technology and consulting corporation. I have since left and relocated to Dubai. I'm not working for a paycheck right now; I have artsy type hobbies and love to read. I'm an American expat of Indian origin, got married last year and we are expecting our first child in September! I will work after, but I'd love to be a stay at home mom eventually! My husband is a mechanical engineer with a post grad in marine engineering and is working as a Facilities Manager. He's also a football fanatic (soccer, not American ;]).
    We're both cradle Catholics and I'm happy to say no longer cultural or lukewarm!!

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  50. Wow, Leila, this was a super interesting thread. *Very* fun to read all the responses!

    Sincerely,
    ~Benjamin

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  51. Welllllll, I'm 57 and have worked since I was 22, so this will take some explanation.

    I was a writer and editor and technical writer and stuff like that for years and years and years and can write better than this, I promise. Then I hit a tough spot in the working road and retired early. I had a wonderful job teaching ESOL, but our youngest graduated from high school after I had done that for a year, and our mental health demanded that we move out of our quarter-acre in a high-maintenance town with cranky neighbors to our three-acre paradise 100 miles from my school. There aren't many jobs out here, but I thought I could find one teaching ESOL again. Wrong! And the job teaching math didn't work out, either. And did I mention that there aren't many jobs out here? So I started my own company. Twice. Neither of them makes much money. Fortunately, I have enough retirement money to last a few more years. Oh, and my husband? Disabled. Doesn't drive. I could use some prayers.

    Yeah, I'm feeling cranky today. Usually I recognize the many blessings in my life, but today I have a migraine and don't have any clue what I'm going to do for the rest of my life to support the family (did I mention that our youngest graduated from college and bounced back home with no job?) and am not very good at being still and knowing that God is God. Grumble grumble grumble!

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  52. Music librarian. Extra production: composer, church singer, wannabe farmer.

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  53. After working in a quasi-judicial position in state government for 10 years, I became a SAHM when my first child was born. When my youngest was in first grade, I went back to school to get a master's degree in education and now teach 5th grade math, science, and religion at our Catholic school right across the street from our house.

    And thank you for asking. Lately I've been dwelling on what I lack. Writing this reminds me just how incredibly blessed I am!

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  54. I've also very likely passed the half-way mark of my life already, so have held a few jobs. Graduated with an MBA (with honors) from a prestigious European university, worked in corporate finance at boutique and Wall Street firms in Germany, London and Hong Kong, then independant M&A consultant in Switzerland for a year, then close to six years deputy head and then head of regional operations in the Middle East of a global non-profit caring for children without parents/preventing abandonment by the parents for economic reasons. I met my wife in this region (though she didn't work for the organization), we had two lovely daughters (now 4 and 6) and soon after moved back to my home country, Austria. I am now back in financial advisory for corporates at a medium sized firm in a senior role, and a board member of the national chapter of a global child-centered NGO (not the one I worked for before).

    Lifelong Catholic but only truly rediscovering the faith in the last few years and trying to practice as best I can. I don't have too much time to study (except Leila's blog!), and since my wife has been following courses and is studying for exams, I also get to look a fair bit after the children when I'm home. My wife is from Syria (converted to Catholicism well after our marriage) and she needs prayers for her family who are still largely there.

    I have huge respect for so many of you fellow-commenters (and, needless to say, for Leila) and ask to bear with my sometimes silly and under-educated questions, often written in a rush in between so much else.

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    1. You are awesome, Sebastian :) Fascinating comment. Always enjoy your input.

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  55. 90% SAHM
    9% pediatric speech-language pathologist. I mostly specialize in feeding/swallowing disorders but I do see all sorts of Peds patients and run a therapeutic theatre program
    1% Ava Anderson Non-toxic consultant because I am intense about the products we use on the boys.

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  56. Oh, you're too sweet Nubby! Compliment wholeheartedly returned! One of the many things I never was particularly good at at school was the hard sciences, and I held those in awe who did (like you). When I think of my girls growing up and what they will do for a living, I always hope for engineering or some such field. But more than that I hope I'll be able to give them a solid grounding in the faith and trust in God, and at least the older one seems to have been touched with God's grace and calling (never too late for the second one, ha ha!)

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  57. I have dipped my toes into quite a few jobs as I began working when I was 15yrs old and I never went to college. My first job was busing tables and then eventually waiting tables. I stayed in the food industry for a few years and then moved to different positions in call centers. Worked security at a store for a short while, ran a gas station, worked at a daycare, and ended my working days running the front office of a radiology facility.

    Now I'm a wife and SAHM to three boys...my oldest just started kindergarten. God willing we would like more, we are even considering adoption later on down the road. I absolutely love being a homemaker although I'm not great at getting everything organized to run like clockwork, I love it anyway. I volunteer with our parish as core for lifeteen and I'm also the EMHC coordinator for our parish.

    My husband served eight years in the Navy and has 16 yrs experience running huge call centers, quite efficiently I might add. Over the summer he was called by God to take a huge leap of faith and did a 180 career change from Customer Service Manager of an insurance company to being the Director of Parish Administration at a local parish. God is Good! He is/we are also in formation for the permanent diaconate. Serving others is so fulfilling and the journey is simply amazing.

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    1. You and your family are an inspiration to all who know you!

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  58. I used to be a fairly regular commenter, but various family trials and tribulations have taken precedence over the past 18-months...still lurk around occasionally. My job title is Environmental Scientist with a global engineering consulting firm, but I mainly deal with landfills and the associated environmental compliance issues: landfill gas collection and monitoring, landfill gas-to-energy, air permitting and reporting, etc... Most recently I've been working on contract with a large power company in Georgia helping them deal with the impending changes in ash and other coal-combustion by-product handling requirements.

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  59. I love reading these comments and learning everyone's unique journey.
    In waiting nearly a decade for our son, I had the opportunity to work alot before being able to live out my dream as a sahm! I earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology because I just loved people. I loved learning about human development, especially. I started our in the mental health field which really wasn't a good fit for me, I am by nature much to sensitive and would stay up at night worried about my clients. I moved along to work as an Early childhood specialist ( teacher and then later regional intake coordinator). I did that for many years, meeting some of the most amazing families. In that role, I served as the first line if contact when a child was diagnosed with a special need or developmental delay, often my referrals came as part of many babies' discharge plans after birth. Most of the other wonderful kids I met just experienced mild delays that with the right resources did super well. Part of my job was to link families to resources, teach adaptions to promote development, link to school resources, etc. I loved that job and only left to help reduce stress to help with fertility issues ;). I then went to work for a diocese, silly me the stress there was double! Ha!! Luckily, our miracle boy came along and the rest is history!

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  60. I'm another English major! My personality is super-critical unfortunately, which means I love editing. I got a master's degree in library science in order to have a more stable income, but this decision back-fired because elderly librarians have no intention of retiring any time soon (and who can blame them in this economy?) So I work at a law firm in D.C. which specializes in healthcare (I actually work just a few blocks from the White House and get on the train at the Pentagon).

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  61. Environmental engineer. DH is an engineer too, and I'm lucky to be able to work party time and spend more time with our DD.

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  62. I don't think I've ever rushed to the computer in the morning with more eagerness at what I'd find, and I was not disappointed! My gosh, you guys are some damn interesting people!! Whoa! Who knew?

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    1. This groovy global get-to-know-you party that you've got going... erm... where's the beer? :)

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    2. Leila could host a big blog get together!!

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  63. Another English major here! I just graduated in May with my Bachelor's and now I'm in the job-search battle and trying to figure out where God wants me. Thanks to finding the Bubble a few years ago, God has given me a huge passion for the virtue of chastity and the pro-life movement so I've been volunteering at a pregnancy center twice/week doing office work for them. My ideal job would be something involving proofreading/editing or doing office work at a parish or pregnancy center.

    I feel so young...only 22 and still single with an ever growing desire to someday be a SAHM, just gotta find a man first though :)

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    1. Your job sounds great, but I understand the urge to use your actual skills! It's very frustrating to feel like you're wasting time.

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  64. I got a degree in management and worked for a shipyard buying equipment overseas, customs clearing and also doing some marketing. It was a lot of fun. I also taught English grades 1-11th for a semester after we got married just because I wanted to try it. Worked as an office manager for the missions team and as an interpreter for a Bible college and a seminary because I felt called to do it. And then my visa came through. We had our first child right away and then two more. I am a SAHM now and studying music privately hoping to open my own studio at some point.

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  65. I am a newly licensed nurse, though I will be volunteering with a home for children run by Catholic Charities for the first year so I'm not sure it counts as a living yet.

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  66. Archdiocese of Philadelphia here. :) My office helps run the Catholic Charities Appeal.

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  67. This is so fun!

    Until last Friday, I was a compliance officer for one of the largest independent registered investment advisor firms in the country (and their broker-dealer and related trust bank). if that sounds boring...you're mostly right. my favorite part of my career was correspondence surveillance, a.k.a. reading everyone's emails and instant messages, second favorite part was contract review. Wow! No wonder I quit to be a SAHM.

    now I am staying home with my 2 (soon to be 3) kids and will begin homeschooling in September. I do some baking, writing and speaking on the side.

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  68. Didn't finish college but I received a few certificates in early childhood development and worked as an assistant teacher in a Montessori school, co teacher at a Protestant preschool before finally landing my favorite job as head preschool teacher for a Catholic preschool. I quit to pursue motherhood. And am now a SAHM to four gorgeous munchkins. My husband is a manager for a state government agency.

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  69. I'm a SAHM now to a 1 and 2 year old with a 3rd on the way. Before kids I worked as the assistant to the director at a small private school for special needs children. I LOVED my job and LOVED the kids even more. I honestly do miss it from time to time, well, mostly the kiddos, but I wouldn't change staying at home with my babies for anything. My husband is a Civil (Geotechnical) Engineer.

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  70. I went to college to be an accountant and hated it. Switched majors and got my BS degree in Art Education. What a switch-a-roo! Certified K-12. My first teaching job I had 400 kids a week in a Catholic School. It was awesome.
    I am now a SAHM of 5 blessings.
    Husband has a PharmD in pharmacology. He currently is working in the cancer ward.

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  71. I'm a SAHM to 5 girls, ages 7 1/2, 5 1/2, 4, 2, and 7 months and I homeschool. I have a M.A. in Theology and a B.A. in Philosophy. I got pregnant just after we got married which was shortly after I graduated so I've never officially used either degree. I've worked as a camp counselor, assistant in a vet office and in a university business office. I'm much happier staying home with my kids and am so very, very blessed to enjoy these years with them. My husband is a moral theologian and currently teaches at Catholic University of America.

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  72. Hi Leila,

    I was a SAHM for several years before taking a very part-time job at our parish rectory. I assisted the parish secretary, and eventually the Religious Education Administrative Assistant. Eight years later and in my third parish, I'm currently the Admin. Assist in a parish rectory. If I could quit my job, I would. Although I enjoy assisting the parishioners and supporting all the parish ministries, I don't enjoy working for priests. Typically they have no training when it comes to managing people, and it shows. Sadly even just three years out of seminary they are made pastors. They often forget that even in the presence of their employees they are called to holiness. Please pray for priests, and their secretaries and other employees. They need it!

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  73. In light of all the English majors/writers/editors and other run of the mill genius’s above , I like to re-introduce myself. My name is Quasimodo and this is my personal stenographer captain hook. Sew, your educational ranking is about to go up. I never really finished high school. Well, let me qualify that. I had a great classic catholic education 1-10. When I transferred to public high school in 11th grade and noticed they were counting their toes in math class, I became a little distracted by everything the culture in the mid-eighties had to offer and professionally pursued that . My formal education ended when my truancy clearing admit card forgery empire collapsed with 1 month before graduation and I had to try to explain why nobody ever saw me in class but I had a perfect attendance record. (talk about a profitable business for a HS senior, and still made it to prom under an alias escorting the homecoming queen) I grew up around a family neighborhood grocery store which to this day I consider the greatest education a young person can have. Have always been a reader and a political junky since I was 12. I taught my Poli-sci wife everything she knows:) . After high school, I worked construction by day and upon the advice of counsel , I would like to invoke my 5th amendment privilege on all details regarding the next six years.
    In 1995 I got into construction project management (meaning Sales) and have been doing that ever since. I mostly do all commercial work now but spent many years in residential which again, is quite the education in learning how people tick. I come from a gigantic family. Ready? 7sibs, 45 nieces & nephews, I think 6 great nieces &nephews. Imagine the exodus scene from the 10 Commandments movie, with the carts and chickens and goats…. that’s what a family picnic looks like.
    Which leads me to this. 17 years ago, a very , very Merciful and Just God, heard the prayers of very faithful loving parents and reached down into the muck, grabbed me by the arm and placed my hand into the hand of the Angel. An Angel that would walk with me back into the Light. An Angel that would inspire, captivate, love, endure and laugh with me. An Angel that would show gentle mercy when needed and a swift boot when necessary. An Angel who is the smartest, toughest, most generous, big hearted, gorgeous, beautiful, stunning, radiant and fun person you will ever meet (not mention super hot!) An Angel who is the most amazing Mom, teacher and guardian of seven of Gods most prized creations. An Angel which always shows the gospel in the flesh and humbles her very lucky husband with her leadership and grace.
    Sweet love of my life, Happy Anniversary !
    and you better get the Top Gun soundtrack out, because we are in the danger zone and it’s time to buzz the tower! We’ll catch up the Millers yet! Yeeeeee Haawwww

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  74. Oh God, sorry for the wall and I forgot: Sew , if you ever need lesson in bagging groceries just look me up.

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    1. I bet we could have a competition-I would totally kick butt!!!

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    2. ...by the end, you have to put the last bag over your head and walk away in shame. Hahaaha

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    3. That's assuming I loose!! Hilarious!

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  75. Oh, I forgot- hubs is a physicist; although he does more computer science stuff right now.

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  76. I have a law degree and a computer science degree. Currently working in software development/testing because there are WAY too many lawyers!

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  77. I am defending my dissertation in anthropology this fall. While completing my degree, I've gained quite a bit of experience teaching college level anthropology courses, doing museum work (conservation/collection management/curatorial), and conducting research in the area of medical/applied anthropology (which is what I'm currently doing).

    My partner is an engineer.

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    1. Our youngest babe is named Gianna, but we call her "Miss G" :)

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    2. Miss G--what is medical/applied anthropology?

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    3. technically, they are sub-disciplines of anthropology. Medical anthropology in a nutshell is the application of anthropological theory/practice/methods to examine issues of health and well-being including treatment, prevention, medical systems, social and cultural factors involving health, etc. It's a varied field that can involve all four areas of anthropology: biological anth, linguistic anth, cultural anth and even archaeology (arch of disease/epidemiology for instance).

      applied anthropology is a more solution-focused sub-discipline of anthropology; it tends to use theory and methods for practical purposes involving social/cultural issues.

      A good example involving both would be a project I worked on a few years ago to evaluate new mental health care initiatives in NM. We interviewed providers, adults with SMI, social supports, community advocates and state officials as well as spending time observing and volunteering in safety-net institutions all over the state.

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    4. applied anthropology is a more solution-focused sub-discipline of anthropology; it tends to use theory and methods for practical purposes involving social/cultural issues.

      Curious, what does this mean? What are you (or anyone studying applied anthropology) solving for - x ?
      And, what does "tends to use" mean vs. "use"? Does applied anthropology "tend to use applied science", yet uses something else the rest of the time? Is the methodology a constant and is exact science part of your mission?

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    5. thanks for the blinding use of bold type face to ask your question.

      applied anthropology is distinguished by a more "hands on" approach as opposed to only theoretical applications of anthropology, i.e., symbolic anthropology. Applied anthropology is also much more concerned with producing research that is useful for individuals and communities; it is often more collaborative based research.


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    6. thanks for the blinding use of bold type face to ask your question.

      ? Bold type face is offensive? I simply highlighted the specific parts I wanted you to address.

      applied anthropology is distinguished by a more "hands on" approach as opposed to only theoretical applications of anthropology, i.e., symbolic anthropology. Applied anthropology is also much more concerned with producing research that is useful for individuals and communities; it is often more collaborative based research.

      This is still unclear as pertains to my question. What I'm asking for is specifics of methodology, I suppose. When you describe a field as anthropology using "solution-based" methods, I'm curious as to what those solutions are, and what the collaborative methods look like. Also, what is meant by "hands on" vs theoretical?

      And, again, you said, "tend to use" theory and methods. Curious, how or when would that be applied?

      To my knowledge, anthropology is holistic in its approach though, presently, more and more university education plans are getting away from that collaborative structure between the fields. I have a curator in the extended family, we've never talked research methodology which is why I asked here.

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    7. "tend": to regularly or frequently behave in a particular way. I'm don't understand what is confusing about my word choice.

      I don't have time to get into an involved conversation with you here about methods, theory and definitions. So, if you are really curious, here is the website for the Society for Applied Anthropology: http://www.sfaa.net/

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    8. "Tend to use" implies irregular or intermittent use. "Use" is more concrete in terms of regularity, to me, esp in terms of methodology.

      As to the rest of it - I found my answer.

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    9. Well, one method for understanding the definition of words is to use a dictionary rather than your own inclinations.

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    10. Well, one method for understanding the definition of words is to use a dictionary rather than your own inclinations.

      Uh-oh, now who's threeee....?

      It's excellent to see that you at least know a how to "methodically" flip the dictionary. However, one should "tend to know' (or concretely know..hmm) how to summarize in thirty words or less which methods are employed in her specialized field. Since you like to talk about your work on this blog, it was your chance to instruct. Instead you play the angry cop out gwen card again.

      I found my answers, I told you. No thanks to your brushing me off to a site, which was lazy. But I found what I needed to completely answer my basic questions. So, no worries, gwen, I won't put you out anymore asking about your specialty, because you're always wound so tightly toward me I pose a question. Have a great night.

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    11. LOL! your answers are always a riot-thanks for the good laugh!

      Sounds to me like you're the one getting your buttons pushed and getting all hot and bothered and overly-emotional : )

      Maybe you could give us a detailed explanation of your previous work doing engineering/vehicle/parts? Or expand upon what you exactly you mean by "jackpot" to describe your current profession as mother?

      Oh-and pulling out the dictionary to define words and concepts is par for the course around here on this blog. You should know that by now. When in Rome....

      You have a great night too Nubby.

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    12. Would you like the interface methodology, Gwen? Or the systems coding, part level changes in design or for build? Or materials usage or procurement, or manufacturing coding/usage or design requirements ... or... ?

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    13. Sure, I'd love to hear about it all. And what prototype vehicles you built and what major corporation you worked for and maybe even what books you like best to read your kids at bedtime.I'm not being sarcastic at all either.

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    14. Wow, look who is a no show when the spotlight is turned on them.

      I'm waiting for your concise explanation of interface methodologies and answers to my questions above.

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    15. Righty-O. I am sure you would be able to keep up.

      What I'm rather curious about is why you lifted a definition of your work instead of just explaining it here? And the methodology I found for your line of word, color me unimpressed. Words like, "Sociological imagination" come in to play, and I'm one Jimi Hendrix song away from publishing my own paper for your class.

      Instead, you'd rather cuddle with a dictionary. Soft science, like soft serve. Doesn't hold up.

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    16. * word should be work. I want to be as precise as possible. Because I'm all about solution focused clarity.

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    17. Just as the world needs vehicles of every kind to keep both the economy and the people going places (literally and figuratively), the world, also, I'm sure, needs ... whatever job it is you kind- of -said you do.

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    18. Well, I'll call it a day then. You won't answer my questions. And, you win the asshole award : )

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    19. 1. average legnth of time graduate students in my department spend doing fieldwork research (based on past 7 years and 20 students): 20 months

      2. partial list of methods employed by anthropologists:

      -learning language(s) other than English
      -identifying key terminology/specific cultural terms and concepts
      -participant observation
      -triangulation
      -snow ball sampling
      -population based sampling
      -clinic based sampling
      -casual, informal, formal (recorded) interviews
      -open ended questions
      -surveys
      -coding
      -indexing
      -using software programs such as SAS and nVivo to index and code
      -photo voice
      -video
      -social mapping
      -statistics
      -GPS
      -Institutional review Board protocol
      -community collaboration protocol
      -informed consent protocol
      -taxonomic analysis
      -inter-discplinary collaboration involving other methods: poetry analysis, speech analysis carbon dating, soil analysis, bio-statistics, pollen and plant analysis, control groups, etc.)

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    20. This must be for the benefit of lurkers. I already got my answers to this thread.

      Since I'm here, this further illustrates my point from earlier, and doesn't clear up my original questions, alas. It illustrates that your line of work "tends to use" applied science, which is exactly why that differential was important to my own understanding. And in the areas in which it doesn't use applied science, it uses softer methods. Got it. Tends to in some areas, doesn't for the finished outcome.

      You also omitted this, which I lifted straight from the AACS site:
      "Sociological practice is a more general term for both Applied and Clinical Sociology. Steele and Price (2004) define sociological practice as “any use (often client-centered) of the sociological perspective and/or its tools in the understanding of, intervention in, and/or enhancement of human social life.” The American Sociological Association notes that applied and clinical sociologies are complementary approaches (Careers in Clinical Sociology, 2003)."

      So, being thorough for my own sake, I hit the term, "sociological perspective" which punted me directly to "sociological imagination" which lead me to more info. as pertains to the field entirely. Got it. It's clear for me. Hope it's clear to anyone else interested.


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    21. I am not to proud to admit, this is all Greek to me! I don't understand any of this. So, I am so glad that Nubby and Gwen can pick this up for the lurkers. Truly, thank you guys!

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    22. Leila, I have to agree that my list kind of sounds like a foreign language ; )

      So Nubby, I finally make a list of the methods you asked me for and yet you have yet to produce any of the "methods" you claim you used in your pre-mother hen life (doin' whatever it is you did.....)

      Also you clearly have your head buried in the sand. I am NOT a sociologist! Big distinction there, lady! Heeellllo!! What the hey is AACS? You know what, you think whatever you want to think since you make up your own answers.

      First you claim to have your answers, then you don't, now you do again. Whatever.

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    23. Wha'ts eating ya, Gwen? Sounding a bit unglued here. By all means, don't let let my inadequacies of comprehending your work cause you to become so emotionally spastic.

      BTW: You 'methods list'? Doesn't answer applicability to my original questions. It's a keyword search return, which I ran myself. Your items on there - maybe about 25% are applicable to hard science. I get it. No worries. You either can't or won't clear up my original questions. And the AACS, Gwen? It is one of the very organizations listed under organizations for applied anthropology I was directed to via the link you gave me . Don't be mad because I did some homework. Sociology and Anthropology- there's no separating the two.

      Your hatred of mothers and motherhood is thick, though. And that's a spirit I get bored with.

      Thanks for being a gracious hostess, Leila, I owe you an apology.

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    24. Wow, you're a piece of work Nubby. Your fallback insult is to claim I'm being emotional? Please, try something else. You're the one who is coming un-hinged. "No worries"? Honey, I'm not worried in the least....it's you who should be worried since you can't list any methods you claim you used on your job.

      Clearly you didn't do your homework and you have absolutely no understanding of anthropology or you wouldn't be making false claims that there is no difference between the two.

      And where in the world do you get off saying I hate mothers and motherhood? The lies you spew out are incredible.

      Yay for you Nubby-proving once again it's impossible to have an intelligent, civil debate with you.

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    25. ;) Have a good day, gwen.

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  78. I'm currently a freelance writer designing religion, English, and character-formation curriculum, and writing screenplays, TV pilots, and novels.

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  79. Hey, Leila,

    I am a long-time reader, but have never commented before.

    I hold undergraduate degrees in both journalism and political science (graduated in May 1999); just last year, I completed a Masters of Arts in Teaching, with a concentration in secondary (high school) English. I have not yet pursued employment, however, as my husband and I feel it's best that I stay home full-time with our two young boys (ages 9 and 7).

    Once the school year begins (just a few more weeks now), I plan to devote a lot of time to volunteer work, likely at a local nursing home. Additionally, I just began a blog on embracing the Catholic perspective (will officially launch in a few weeks -- maybe sooner).

    Keep up the good work. I check in with you every day ;)

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    1. Lauren, awesome! Come back and post the link when you are launched! :)

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    2. L,

      I will! And thank you for inviting me to do so ;) I'll post it as a reply to this comment here.

      L

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  80. #1 I'm a Husband. #2 I'm a Dad. #3 I'm an IT guy at a printing company.
    My wife and I have six children, now aged 31 to 17, 3 grandchildren. One of those was given up for adoption. Still our grandchild.
    Oh, I'm also a Catholic by birth and by choice.

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  81. You guys are amazing. Seriously. I am really enjoying this. Every one of you is unique among all men, and there really is no end to the depths of what you are doing in your lives. There are real lives behind all the comments, and my goodness, what vitality and gifts you bring to this world! Thank you!

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  82. Long time lurker, first time commenter. I am a 23yr engineer. I hold a BS in Ceramic Engineering (a branch of materials science) and I work full time as Test Lab engineer in an analytical laboratory. I currently pursuing my MBA after work. My husband and I volunteer up at our parish and volunteer as the Catechists for the high schoolers. We stay busy and hope to have a family soon.

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  83. Catie, awesome!

    And to everyone, please feel free to break the rules of commenting on this particular thread. You all may have questions or want to address a particular commenter, so please feel free to have your own conversations with the "reply" function.

    Thanks to csawww for that great suggestion!

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  84. From a reader who emailed and gave me permission to paste it here:

    Hi Leila,

    I just started reading your blog and I love it!

    I am a divorced mother of five, and I work as an operator for Tucson, Az Police.

    God Bless you!

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  85. Just starting out as a dual-degree MD/PhD student, getting tuition and a stipend paid for by my school and the National Institutes of Health. I have to keep telling myself it's my job now, because eight more years of school is such a terrifying proposition otherwise. Super impressed with everyone doing liberal arts PhDs (medieval literature? can't even wrap my mind around it), and the one brave soul who did a physics degree.

    Gwen, I wanted to take a medical anthropology course so badly during undergrad, but of course they decided to just not offer it the one year I could have taken it. Any good book suggestions? My not-so-secret dream is to be Paul Farmer when I grow up.

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    1. Michelle, I'm sorry to hear the medical anthropology course wasn't being offered when you were ready to take it : ( Paul Farmer is so amazing and his work is so incredible. I had the chance to hear him talk a few years ago, it was wonderful. I'm so pleased to hear you want to follow in his footsteps! Kudos to you for being in an MD/Phd program too. 8 years won't last forever! you can do it : )

      As for good reads, anything by Paul Farmer of course. "The Spirit Catches you and you fall down" is good. I've used articles by Barbara Rylko-Bauer before for students. "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Sacks" is pretty interesting. Some classic med/applied anthro work is "The Woman in the Body" by Emily Martin.

      Good luck with your studies!

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    2. Gwen, I am ignorant when it comes to anthropology. Are those authors all secular/atheist/left-wing? If so, do you balance it with philosophies/works from "the other side" for your students?

      And Michelle, congrats on getting tuition and a stipend! How'd you do that? I'd love to tell my son, who would be thrilled for something similar (he is working at the Mayo Clinic during the summers -- a paid research internship which is a real blessing). He's got two years left before med school, so we are looking at any and all advice!

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    3. Gwen, I loved the HeLa book! Actually, I saw Paul Farmer speak just this past spring at a Nobel Peace Prize Forum event – so fantastic. I need to buckle down and read more than just Mountains Beyond Mountains, and I will definitely check those others out. Thanks so much for the encouragement! :)

      Leila, thanks! I'm in a program called the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). About 45 schools across the country have dual-degree MD/PhD programs that are supported by the NIH, so students pay no tuition and get paid about as much as a grad student throughout the program. (I think there are non-MSTP MD/PhD programs that have similar deals, too, just without the NIH support – I actually didn't know these existed until it was too late, so I don't know anything about the application process for them.)

      I'd definitely encourage your son to look into the program. It's a fantastic deal, and if he has a Mayo Clinic internship, I'm guess he's doing really well. Here's a general overview of the program (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_Scientist_Training_Program) and a list of the specific programs with links to their pages with more info (http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Training/InstPredoc/PredocInst-MSTP.htm). Definitely email me if you think he'd be interested – I'd be happy to talk about preparation and the application process! :)

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    4. whoops, "I'm guessing"*

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    5. Michelle, I'm sure you've read "The Emperor of All Maladies" Not a piece of medical anthropology literature, but I found it absolutely fascinating.

      Leila, the authors I mentioned above are extremely knowledgeable, well-regarded scientists with years of experience. I have no idea what their personal beliefs are-I am concerned with their ideas and their research.

      When I teach students, I like to expose them to a variety of ideas, projects, researchers and theoretical concepts. I've had LGBTQ students, Mormon students, Catholic students, Republicans and left-leaning students. I encourage them to think critically about the issues we discuss in class and they are free to agree or disagree with the literature.

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    6. Michelle, thank you! I had no idea! I will send this along to him, and I'll contact you if I have any questions. Yes, thanks, he's doing so well, and we are so proud of him.

      Gwen, thanks, I appreciate your answer as well. I asked because there is a feeling in conservative circles that the field of anthropology is dominated by left-wing ideology. I hope that is simply a misperception.

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    7. Gwen, I actually haven't (the amount of for-fun reading I've done the past few years is appallingly little), but it's going on the list. Thank you!

      And Leila, you're welcome! The program is really badly publicized – I would have never heard about it if I hadn't been lucky enough to work with someone in the program at my undergrad school. Anyway, if your son is interning at Mayo, I can only imagine how well he must be doing in general. I'm proud of him too!

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    8. Aw, thanks, Michelle! It's so weird, my son has always been a good kid, but was a bit of a slacker in high school. But he's kicked it into gear during college and is flooring us! His doctor mentor wants him to present his research in Rochester next month (!!!) but that's the weekend of my daughter's wedding… Still, such an honor! And he's only 20, so we are just so flipping proud. He is also working at the lab at his university and they had offered him a paid summer job, too, but he took Mayo. Counting our blessings!

      I asked him if he had heard of your program type and he had! His mentor at Mayo had told him about it! Mom learns something new every day, ha ha. Thanks again!

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    9. Oh, but that's great! Arguably better than getting burnt out in high school and slogging through college just for the degree. Awesome that he was asked to present – I'm sure if he's at this stage already, he'll have plenty of other chances to actually do it, at Mayo or elsewhere!

      Anyway, glad he's heard of the program, and I hope he considers it! Let me know if I can be of any help. :)

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    10. Gwen-that Henrietta story is horrifying!

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    11. It is rather horrifying. I think it's very important though for students to know about it though. Here is a link to a brief article with an update on the subject:

      http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/11/opinion/sunday/another-twist-in-the-saga-of-henrietta-lacks.html?_r=0

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    12. Truly horrifying, a violation of Henrietta's human rights and dignity. It should offend us all.

      For the readers, this is the same reason why embryonic stem cell research is gravely immoral: We don't use human beings for raw research material without their permission (and in the case of embryos, the human being is killed in the process of using his/her cells). Same with using cells from an aborted baby for research purposes. It's cannibalism.

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    13. Ah, but despite embryologists unanimously defining a human embryo as a living, growing human being, it's not a "person", you see. (Refer my post on Personhood on your concurrent other thread). So this class of human beings, the weakest of the weak, are guaranteed no "life equality", like we adult animals - whoops, adult "persons" - are entitled to "marriage equality", "wage equality", "luxury equality", "ice cream equality", "titillation equality", "gender equality", "public toilet equality", "healthcare equality", "cannibalizing equality", and the like, ad infinitum, thank you.

      It's a sick, sick, sick, sick world, and it's certainly no measure of good health to be well attuned to it.

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  86. I am a college instructor and homeschool mom. My background is in Anthropology and Theology.(I have Masters degrees in those.) I think of motherhood as my real job though.

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  87. I have only three classes to go to complete my Masters in Theology and Christian Ministry. Was a very happy SAHM for the first 20 years of marriage and have worked for the Church for the past 16 years. I love my job as Director of Marriage and Family Life in a multicultural city parish. My husband was a carpenter then teacher of building trades (high school) then full time missionary to Guatemala, then more teaching and now works to form deacons for our diocese.

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  88. I am new to this blog, but LOVE it. I am a computer tech for an insurance company. My wife is a stay-at-home mom mostly, but works some evenings as a Pharmacy Tech. (Extra money and to keep her sanity.) We have 6 kids, 5 boys and 1 girl, ages 10 down to 7 months old.

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  89. I'm a pathologist and my husband is a stay at home dad to our 5 kiddos, homeschooling some of them. I often feel that I don't really fit in either world (working mom or homeschooling family) very well!

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  90. Funny my post follows Anonymous @ 5:44!
    I am a pediatric audiologist. My husband is a freelance artist/illustrator/3-D modeler/inde video game developer/writer, and a stay at home/homeschooling dad to our 3 "babies" (6, 3, & 7m). His professional projects are few and far between since the arrival of our first, but he is grooming them for entrepreneurship in hopes that some will share his interests. We have a shared dream of opening a school.
    Our 'backward' family sure has its challenges, but hubs & I tend to fly in the face of "popular" ideals, anyway.
    Oh, and I was raised Catholic by my cradle-Catholic father & convert mother. Despite my wandering in to the Methodist church while in college (and meeting my son-of-a-Methodist-pastor husband there), I am still a Catholic at heart. Reading this blog has made me realize the gaping holes in my Catholic education. Hubs & I lean pretty far in the Catholic direction, especially in this day, when much of the church is abandoning Truth for social convention. But I don't know if I'll ever convince him to make the leap!

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  91. P.S. I love that the question, "What do you do for a living?" has prompted much broader responses from people. We are so much more than what we do "for a living"!!

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  92. Bri, amen! This post has been fascinating in ways I did not imagine!

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  93. I am a student with no money going back to finish my undergraduate degree. Between the government and my school I get ~10k/yr to live on. "How?", you will probably ask, I have no idea. God told me to go where I am, after 5 years of feeling like Jonah, I decided to obey, and then I couldnt afford it or get the requisite loans. I was at my wits end because I had finally left my job and moved away from where I wasn't supposed to be, and then the school just called me to tell me the news a day after orientation started. I packed my stuff and off I went the next morning. I'm still not sure exactly why I am here, I hate schoolwork, though I love learning—left to my own devices I read for maybe 12 hours a day about a huge range of subjects, pretty much anything really. I am going to start a nonprofit to help the schools in my area this school year while I am in college. And some friends and I in DC might try to start a think tank promoting distributism and catholic social teaching using protestant money after this year. This is easy since it is based on Jesus and truth and whatnot. I look forward to mentioning Pope Leo after this gets off the ground. Another name for Catholic social teaching is Christian social teaching, since they are the same thing.
    I got confirmed this past Easter after suffering through RCIA, and afterwards learned that as a former Anglican, all I had to do was submit my written intent to become a Catholic! It was good for me though I think, even though I didnt learn much, and it was good to be able to help.

    -Ed

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  94. I used to reply sometimes as anon 11:11 (I think that was it?). I've been an ICU RN for 10 years. I now work part time and spend as much time as possible with my 2 young sons. Given my career, I mostly enjoy the conversations about life and death, euthanasia, and that stuff. I see sickness, suffering, death, grief, etc on such a regular basis, it can be overwhelming. Anyways, I'm really enjoying reading these comments :)

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    1. Great to see you again, anon 11:11! It's been a while!

      Ed, I will pray for the success of your endeavors! And yes, RCIA can be a real trial...

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  95. Intermittent Lurker. Mom of 3, homeschool mom, part-time veterinarian, runner, triathlete, confirmation teacher. I used to work full time and be the main bread winner, but my husband is finally in a position to use his GI bill and go back to school and I cut back to homeschool our kids. Being a mother is the highest calling, and I say that even though I still love my professional career.

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  96. I'm retired but do volunteer work for a on-line Catholic group out of the Tampa area in that I search for inspirational quotes for each day of the week from Saints and other Holy men and women. It keeps me busy and allows me to find some really great writings from the Early Church Fathers up to today,.
    Richard

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  97. Regular blog reader and CFO of the "Leila Admiration Society"! Haha. Leila, thank you so much for your entertaining and insightful blog. You tell us what is going on in an easy to understand way.

    I am a CPA, self employed part time tax preparer (for 23 years, and an empty nester.

    My commenter name is my confirmation name! There really is a St. Potamiaena. She is my friend. God bless the communion of saints and bloggers!

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  98. Currently im a SAHM with 2 kids. As I'm an immigrant riding along on my hubbys work visa I'm not allowed to work. I could change that but i like saying that im not allowed to work for money as though being a parent or a volunteer aren't jobs. Money isnt everything.

    I have a BME thats bach of music ed and did some grad work in musicology. I've worked a variety of jobs mostly involving children. Day care. Youth minister. Teacher's assistant and part time music teacher. Etc.

    My husband is a meteroriticist. Currently hes working on a terrestrial impact. Read geology.

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  99. Part 1 of 4

    KarenAugust 9, 2013 at 6:16 AM
    At my grocery store I have learned that not everyone bags groceries well. ;)
    The Cypress Shall GrowAugust 11, 2013 at 1:25 PM
    It's true! Not everyone bags groceries well. I had a young man at my local grocery store who would consistently try to put the hot roasted chicken in the same bag as and on top of my ice cream. Every time, I had to tell him not to do that. Seriously.

    Francis ChoudhuryAugust 11, 2013 at 2:43 PM
    Cheer up. He was thinking somewhat, or it could've been worse. He could've put the ice cream on top of the hot chicken! Ever tried roast chicken with chocolate topping? Now there's an idea!

    Sew , apparently there is a gaping wound in the world regarding the lack of proper grocery containment engineering ( good Baggers if you will). This is probably a topic that only you and I could intelligently address since we appear to be only people with extensive real life experience in this discipline. So for the benefit of our more Linear thinking brethren (thx Leila) , I should explain the role and dynamics of the retail grocery experience.
    The most important person in the grocery store is the bagger eeeerrrr Grocery Containment Engineer. The over-all goal of the store is create repeat happy customers that do not hesitate to drop in and spend money. Customers typically only have contact with 2 people. Checker and Bagger. It is often wrongly assumed that the checker is the lead person in creating a lovely experience. WRONG! The checker’s job is to accurately tally the bill. They ( the checkers) are taking the customers money, and the customer needs to be assured that this is being done properly in order for them to leave in peace. A talky , distracted, overly engaging checker only adds to the customers un-ease and suspicion that maybe mistakes are being made. The customer will be subconsciously aggravated because the checker is a wind bag and it may be costing them money. That leaves the Grocery Containment Engineer/Public Relations Specialist to put the right face and feeling in front of the customer leaving them happy and smiling or at ease and content depending on the customers personality. It takes a nimble mind and tremendous intuition to do it right. This can best be explained through 2 hypothetical examples. A proper way and an improper way engage said customer.
    continued

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  100. Part 2 of 4
    Sew, due to your glaring arrogance and high opinion in your own ability to bag groceries, I will use you as an example of the improper way to deal with a customer.

    Here is the scene: Late evening, 4 people in line, and Nubbys is next up. She is buying her usual. One 35lb chuck roast, a 20lb bag of charcoal, an Ace bandage, a bottle of mercurochrome and 12oz diet coke. You Sew, ask the typical “paper or plastic” question. Nubby growls “what do you think”?. You Sew, make the critical mistake of assuming she really doesn’t care, when she is really asking “do you know the difference?”. So you say “Oh I would use paper because it helps the environment”. Now there is no turning back. You have told her that not only are you a crowd following sheep, but also, that you have no idea what you are saying with” it will help the environment”. Nubby then launches into a 2 minute discourse on how and why more fossil fuels are used in the recycling process of the paper bags than the manufacturing of plastic bags. And plastic causes virtually 0 net space in the landfill and that more importantly it is preposterous for you to assume the right answer when obviously there was zero methodology applied to your reasoning . It all ends with a stiff index finger in chest …” mother earth has become a tramp, and people like you are her fools”. Needless to say , the whole exchange causing a serious buzz kill for all who witnessed it therefore failing in the Baggers number one objective to create happy, at ease, return customers. Not to mention the damage caused to the poor slob that Nubby checked through the glass into the 2 row at practice all because of her frustration with you Sew!

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    1. Promise I wouldn't treat Sew that way. I'd ask her what her method is for bagging, and she'd be more than capable of explaining it to me.
      Swap out that diet coke for a crisp microbrew.

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    2. The actors in this drama have no power to revise the script. ( I'm trying to enhance your online persona nubby, you know, kinda like an "art of war" thing. Now don't screw it up by bei g nice to Sew.

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    3. LOL -gotcha. Great use of metaphor.

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    4. And seriously, you must tell. You really play Ice hockey on actual ice with pads and shield etc? That is just Bitchen. Is it a league for adults? semi pro? Or what? Do tell more

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    5. Emailed Leila to send ur way

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    6. Thx. And I hope you understand that I jest, based on people's reaction to your style which I just dig. I grew up kinda "street" so I find it harilarius when people whine. The ability of all you guys to keep your cool and stay on task is amazing. Many times I'll have pulled the pin on a grenade only to find that you all have worked it out in civil way. It's all good learning for me. So I carefully put the pin back into the charge handle and calm down. :)

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    7. U r hilarious - always laughin' here

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    8. Just so we're perfectly clear with your little nonsensical metaphors Csawww, I was specifically asked by Leila via e-mail to respond to the question in the post-and so I did so in good faith. Oddly, no one questions the medieval lit student about their "interpretations" or "soft research" or if the accountants and SAHM have to rebel against false impressions that their vocations are too "liberal" or "conservative."

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    9. Gwen, and I appreciate your response to my request. I wanted to have a place to refer to what you do, because I'm always stepping in it when I mess it up. I hope you know that my question about anthropology's reputation for being a left-of-center endeavor was sincere. I don't know anything about it, other than what I hear and read. I do know that there was another commenter here who is also an anthropologist, and maybe she is a devout Catholic? I would love to hear her take as well. Honestly, I have very little experience with the social sciences as they stand today. Medieval literature is pretty standard educational fare (perhaps even neglected as we move away from knowing the foundations of our own civilization), so I didn't have a question about that, or SAHMs (which I am) and accountants (usually non-controversial).

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    10. Miss G, I'm sorry, but I have no idea what your talking about. Really, no malice intended in any way. Peace?

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    11. Waaaaaait! Nonsensical metaphors???? "Who's scruffy lookin?"

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  101. Now for a properly executed example: it’s late evening in Sydney, Francis is in line with 5 people behind him. He has his usual ten cans of Red Bull, 2 boxes of wheat thins (obviously expects a long night in the Bubble) and a bottle of Clear Eyes. I already expect Francis to be some kind of Christian so when I do the “ how are you today sir?” and he answers “ doing well, and You?” I go out on a limb and answer with the classic generic “I’m Blessed”. Usually this would be a good safe answer but I instantly notice a change in his face. Somehow that wasn’t right. I immediately remembered that on a previous visit that Francis had a Holy card in his wallet and the new uneasy look on his face could only mean that his Protestant early warning radar just sounded because of the word “blessed” being used in that way. Recognizing the crisis at hand , I skillfully correct my statement by adding “ as in the Blessed Sacrament, you know….the source and summit of all Truth and Life”. Francis smiles , throws a big bunch of flowers for his mum on top of his Wheat thins and Red bulls, slaps me on the back, happily waves to others in line and leaves. Bagger saves the day and all is well.
    Had I not recovered correctly, it is likely that Francis would have pulled up a stool, cracked one those Red Bulls, and launched into a 15 minute dissertation starting with John 6, going to 1 Cor 10, slipping to the Supper of the Lamb, back to Abraham Isaac and Mechisidek , and circling back to something a about a fourth cup. He doesn’t leave until he runs off a 10 page report about the historical fact that the Romans in the 1st and 2nd century, often convicted Christians on the charge of “cannibalism” by simply asking if they truly eat the body of Jesus!!!! And Leaving with this one question which he expects answered “ with the clear evidence the early Christians literally believed in the Real Presence, how could you possibly use the word Blessed in such a shallow way?”

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  102. You see, Sew and I realize that putting the ice cream on top of the chicken is wrong and that it clearly should never happen. . But these things happen from time to time when having to negotiate the deeper purpose of the Grocery Containment Engineer and our role in keeping world peace and harmony for all you.

    If you have actually read through this, thanks. I really do have a job and don’t have a drinking problem and I’m practicing my writing. And that just killed almost an entire lunch hour.
    I Guess this is my way of saying how much I appreciate all the effort, talent and time you all spend on this, my favorite blog. You guys amaze me daily.
    Love to all.
    Chris

    Ps. Leila , I will accept whatever penalty I've incurred by using so much space. Thanks for letting me be a clown, it's therapeutic

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    1. OMG! ROFL! Man, how'd you figure out all that about me? Just from reading the occasional tidbits I contribute to Leila's innocuous Little Bubble, No Trouble! You're scary! I'll have to watch how much I spill on this blog from here on! Admittedly though, the Eucharist is the consuming (or was that subsuming?) passion of my life. I can perorate on the subject until Safeway's closed, all but one of the Containment Engineers have left for the night, and Nubby's hefty Hertfordshire bulls have come home from the china shop. By the way, I've just emailed "America's Got Talent" recommending a new category for their show: "Who Wants To Be A Checkout Operator Extraordinaire?" Should be so cool to watch Sew and you go head to head, toe to toe and finger to finger for Bagger of the Century!

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    2. I would totally try out for that show!!! I would win the money!!! Chris, you crack me up! God calls us all, even check out operators!!! This post gives my life even more purpose! Lol

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    3. Chris-I hate leaving my babies...wonder how I would explain that my first live is bagging groceries! Sorry kids, momma will be right back!!

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    4. live-love my phone hates me!

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    5. Sew, your comment so reminded me of those magnificent days of seeing 6 big carts of groceries, customers heads are down loading the belt, fresh crisp stack of large paper bags......woooo.... Bring it on! Heavy, tight , full base of can goods on the bottom, box goods midway and top off with lite filler. Some quick witty banter. Just loved it. And as far as a competition, well....anytime! Anywhere ! It will be like when the devil went done Georgia!
      And my pho e is also possessed. Half time I want to throw it on table and yell "are you typing or am I" ? I swear I'm not as illiterate as my phone thinks I is.
      Francis, glad I could bring a smile. I just love all the work you throw down around hear. I was telling Leila, I feel like all you guys are brothers because you all so ably defend the faith that I hold so dear. And shoot , pretty easy guess on the Eucharist thing. Anybody I know who has gone deep in their faith, has at some level stood in utter amazement and awe at the greatest ongoing miracle in the history of the world. It's the one bit of apologetics that really sticks on me. One line that has always stuck goes something like this : ( I don't have it in front of me but it goes something like this in regards to the argument of symbolic or real.: " At the last supper , Christ was not speaking g to modern rationalists. He was speaking to ordinary men not given to analyzing mysterious phraseology and meaning. He was giving them his last will and testament. As a dying father to his children before he departs. They were hanging on every word ready accept whatever he had to say. What absolute cruelty it would have been for Christ, the omniscient God, whose gaze the future was ever present, to use such an occasion , a strange metaphor that would for 20 centuries plunged the entire Christian world into useless and stupid idolatry.
      Peace Friends

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    6. That was funny, Francis! :)

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  103. Chris, I only read a line here and there and immediately knew that this was gonna be so good that I need to wait till deep in the wee hours of the night/morning, when all is quiet in my house, and kick back in peace and excitement ready to be entertained! Whooot! I can't wait!!

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  104. I'm a home-schooling mom of 4, 5th on the way. Before kids, I worked as a speech-language pathologist in a public elementary school. I worked with all kinds of speech/language issues, but the best part of my job was working in a resource room for high-functioning kids with autism. Before that, I worked briefly in a hospital, doing both out-patient and acute care. I very quickly learned that my calling was with children. My husband is a professor of Environmental Economics.

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  105. Professional Photographer, specializing in portraits. i have a studio in a quaint little town and i work for myself...but...my 'dream' job would be to work for a Catholic News Agency or at the Vatican or even our local Diocese as a documentary portrait photographer. I would love to spend a day photographing the Pope or our local Bishop. I'd also like to be assigned a project photographing a 'day in the life' of some of the more traditional nuns and Sisters (read nuns in full habit)...one can dream, right?!

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  106. PS, Leila we are friends on FB...also want to add that our stories are very similar. I am married to a wonderful Jewish man who agreed our daughter would be raised Catholic. Let's just say i pray a lot to St. Edith Stein ;-)

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  107. Gwen,

    I once read (don't ask me where) that some anthropologists posit that the human smile actually originated as a snarl. According to the theory, early man would bare his teeth in an intimidatory manner (like some animals do) when threatened or fighting with another over a food source. As food supplies and basic provisions became more abundant and sufficient for all, the snarl allegedly subsided into a non malevolent smile and has now morphed, in fact, to an expression of good will...

    Do you know anything about this? Is there any scientific basis for such a theory? I'm just curious about it, that's all. I find it intriguing that in all of Christian Scripture there never appears to be a mention of anyone (including Jesus) ever smiling at anyone or anything! :)

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  108. Francis, I don't know, but my specialty is not biological anthropology. I will consult the books I have in that area and ask people I know who are better informed.

    -Gwen

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    1. Thanks, Gwen. Don't put yourself out over finding an answer to this; I was just asking in passing.

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  109. EUCHARIST: SYMBOLIC BODY AND BLOOD OF CHRIST? HA!
    (Part 1 of 3)

    Chris,

    Thanks for your comments, especially about the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist.

    Jesus, expressly and unambiguously, said, “Except you eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink His blood, you shall not have life in you…” (John 6:54).

    Nevertheless, some people choose to wage a heretical argument that Christ was commanding us to eat mere bread and drink mere wine only as symbols of His body and blood – that He was speaking metaphorically.

    That is definitely not the case! Indeed it cannotbe the case, because the expressions to “eat someone’s flesh” or to “drink someone’s blood” already had a long and well established metaphorical meaning for Jews – so much so that just about every person listening to Jesus would’ve known that He couldn't possibly be speaking metaphorically when He spoke to them of their need to eat His body and drink His blood.

    The metaphorical meaning of those expressions, for Jews (and for Arabs – even to this day!), was to wage war against a person (“eat his flesh”) and do harm to that person (“drink his blood”).

    So if Jesus was speaking metaphorically, He would’ve been talking absolute nonsense! He would’ve been saying, “Unless you wage war against me and do harm to me, you will suffer eternal death!” That's how absurdHis words would’ve been!

    I first read this a few months ago in a very old book by a Jesuit on the principal tenets of the (true) Christian faith. I was so intrigued by the above claim (about the pre-existence among Jews of a metaphorical meaning of the expressions “eating flesh” and “drinking blood”, that, on a sheer hunch and nothing else, I did a quick (electronic) search of the entire Bible for those expressions. Lo and behold! Halleluiah! There were more verses in Scripture than you can poke a stick at, containing words - spoken by none other than God Himself!!! - which make abundantly clear the established metaphoricalmeaning of “eating flesh” and “drinking blood”. Below are a few of them. They would’ve been known to Jesus’ Jewish audience (and to the Apostles) hence the question of His meaning the words metaphorically, in John 6 for example, could NOT have arisen seriously in their minds. (Which is precisely why some of His followers, on hearing His words, walked away!) If “Bible believing Christians" really didknow and understand the Bible half as much as the Church which compiled the Scriptures does, they wouldn’t be cheating themselves of the greatest gift of God (the Gift of His own self!!!) as they so tragically do today!

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  110. EUCHARIST: SYMBOLIC BODY AND BLOOD OF CHRIST? HA!
    (Part 2 of 3)

    Isaiah 9 (Judgments upon Israel for their sins.)
    9:19. By the wrath of the Lord of hosts the land is troubled, and the people shall be as fuel for the fire: no man shall spare his brother.
    9:20. And he shall turn to the right hand, and shall be hungry: and shall eat on the left hand, and shall not be filled: every one shall eat the flesh of his own arm: Manasses Ephraim, and Ephraim Manasses, and they together shall be against Juda. (They’ll fight against each other, but also fight simultaneously against Juda).
    ________________________________________
    Isaiah 49
    49:26. And I will feed thy enemies with their own flesh: and they shall be made drunk with their own blood, as with new wine: (they’ll fight and harm/kill each other) and all flesh shall know, that I am the Lord that save thee, and thy Redeemer the Mighty One of Jacob.
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    Jeremiah 19 (Prophecy of desolation for the Jews)
    19:9. And I will feed them with the flesh of their sons, and with the flesh of their daughters: and they shall eat every one the flesh of his friend (they’ll turn on each other) in the siege, and in the distress wherewith their enemies, and they that seek their lives, shall straiten them.
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    Baruch 2
    2:2. That the Lord would bring upon us great evils, such as never happened under heaven, as they have come to pass in Jerusalem, according to the things that are written in the law of Moses:
    2:3. That a man should eat the flesh of his own son, and the flesh of his own daughter. (Like Jesus has prophesied for our own times, that over matters of the faith a man will turn against his father, and daughter against her mother, etc… Matt 10:35).
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    Ezekiel 39
    39:17. And thou, O son of man, saith the Lord God, say to every fowl, and to all the birds, and to all the beasts of the field: Assemble yourselves, make haste, come together from every side to my victim, which I slay for you, a great victim upon the mountains of Israel: to eat flesh, and drink blood.
    39:18. You shall eat the flesh of the mighty, and you shall drink the blood of the princes of the earth, of rams, and of lambs, and of he goats, and bullocks, and of all that are well fed and fat.
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    Daniel Chapter 7 (Daniel's vision of the four beasts, signifying four kingdoms: of God sitting on his throne: and of the opposite kingdoms of Christ and Antichrist.)
    7:1. In the first year of Baltasar, king of Babylon, Daniel saw a dream: and the vision of his head was upon his bed: and writing the dream, he comprehended it in a few words: and relating the sum of it in short, he said:
    7:2. I saw in my vision by night, and behold the four winds of the heavens strove upon the great sea.
    7:3. And four great beasts, different one from another, came up out of the sea.
    (Four great beasts. . .Viz., the Chaldean, Persian, Grecian, and Roman empires.)
    7:4. The first was like a lioness, and had the wings of an eagle: I beheld till her wings were plucked off, and she was lifted up from the earth, and stood upon her feet as a man, and the heart of a man was given to her.
    7:5. And behold another beast, like a bear, stood up on one side: and there were three rows in the mouth thereof, and in the teeth thereof, and thus they said to it: Arise, devour much flesh (wage war on these four godless empires).

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  111. EUCHARIST: SYMBOLIC BODY AND BLOOD OF CHRIST? HA!
    (Part 3 of 3)

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    Micah 3 (For the sins of the rich oppressing the poor, of false prophets flattering for lucre, and of judges perverting justice, Jerusalem and the temple shall be destroyed.)
    3:1. And I said: Hear, O ye princes of Jacob, and ye chiefs of the house of Israel: Is it not your part to know judgment,
    3:2. You that hate good, and love evil: that violently pluck off their skins from them and their flesh from their bones?
    3:3. Who have eaten the flesh of my people (persecuted them), and have flayed their skin off them: and have broken, and chopped their bones as for the kettle, and as flesh in the midst of the pot.
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    Zechariah 11
    11:9. And I said: I will not feed you: that which dieth, let it die: and that which is cut off, let it be cut off: and let the rest devour every one the flesh of his neighbour.
    11:16. For behold I will raise up a shepherd in the land, who shall not visit what is forsaken, nor seek what is scattered, nor heal what is broken, nor nourish that which standeth, and he shall eat the flesh of the fat ones, and break their hoofs.
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    Romans 14
    14:21. It is good not to eat flesh and not to drink wine (have dissensions among yourselves, slander, attack or do harm to each other): nor any thing whereby thy brother is offended or scandalized or made weak.
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    James 5 (A woe to the rich that oppress the poor. Exhortations to patience and to avoid swearing. Of the anointing the sick, confession of sins and fervour in prayer.)
    5:1. Go to now, ye rich men: weep and howl in your miseries, which shall come upon you.
    5:2. Your riches are corrupted: and your garments are motheaten.
    5:3. Your gold and silver is cankered: and the rust of them shall be for a testimony against you and shall eat your flesh like fire (harm you). You have stored up to yourselves wrath against the last days.
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    Revelations 19
    19:16. And he hath on his garment and on his thigh written: KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS.
    19:17. And I saw an angel standing in the sun: and he cried with a loud voice, saying to all the birds that did fly through the midst of heaven: Come, gather yourselves together to the great supper of God:
    19:18. That you may eat the flesh of kings and the flesh of tribunes and the flesh of mighty men and the flesh of horses and of them that sit on them: and the flesh of all freemen and bondmen and of little and of great.
    19:19. And I saw the beast and the kings of the earth and their armies, gathered together to make war with him that sat upon the horse and with his army.
    19:20. And the beast was taken, and with him the false prophet who wrought signs before him, wherewith he seduced them who received the character of the beast and who adored his image. These two were cast alive into the pool of fire burning with brimstone.
    19:21. And the rest were slain by the sword of him that sitteth upon the horse, which proceedeth out of his mouth: and all the birds were filled with their flesh.
    ________________________________________
    Esdras 15 (Apocrypha)
    57 And thy children shal dye for famine: and thou shalt fal by the sword, and thy cities shal be destroyed, & al thyne shal fal in the filde by the sword.
    58 And they that are in the mountaines, shal perish, with famine, and shal eate their owne flesh, & drinke bloud, (harm and kill each other) for the famine of bread and thirst of waters (without the food of God).
    59 Vnhappie by the seas shalt thou come, and againe thou shalt receuie euils.

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  112. Chris,

    I’ve also been meaning to write a little article on “subsumation” in relation to the Eucharist (one of the gazillion things I’ve been meaning to do :)).

    Everything in creation is subsumed into something else, until all things are finally subsumed into God. Minerals are broken down into their elementary parts and subsumed by, for example, a seed. A seed "falls to the ground and dies", and is subsumed into the organism of a plant. The plant is consumed by animals, and subsumed into their bodies. We eat both plants and animals and subsume their constituent parts. The question is: does it end there? The Catholic narrative is that in the Eucharist we too, in turn, are subsumed into Christ; we are finally and quite in one literal sense, “in Christ”. Which is precisely what eternal life is all about – being subsumed into the Trinitarian life of God Himself!

    Now you can put that where the squirrel puts his nuts, and chew on it awhile! :)

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    1. P.S. Sin is anything that interrupts this glorious subsumation process. When we sin we head in the opposite direction - decay and death - by which we "return to dust". Makes a heckuvalotof sense, no?

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  113. Francis , that is extraordinary and fascinating. The Eucharist is a mind blower on many levels. I had no idea how much the OT references flesh like that. I knew the Jewish understanding and context of John 6 and no wander why they walked away and it was a big enough exodus to be mentioned directly by John. I will need to sit down and think about subsumation After coffee. it bounced right off my skull this morning. hanks again Pal

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    1. THE PASSION OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST
      (Part 1 of 2)

      Chris,

      You're welcome, mate. When pondering the phenomenon of subsumation, recall St Paul's words, "I no longer live, but Christ lives in me!" (Gal 2:2).

      That's ANOTHER paper I've been meaning to write (:)): about how much of Scripture can actually be taken in a literal sense! As you yourself have pointed out, Christ brought the Good News to simple folk, like fishermen, who wouldn't have understood a word of His if great sophistry, so prevalent in today's thinking (of the kind we constantly encounter right here on this blog!), was involved. No, Christ spoke simply, truthfully and (I would contend) quite often literally. Thus, most of His disciples understood Him well enough even to die terrible deaths for Him.

      Last year I wrote a paper on "The Passion of Our Lord". This was after I stumbled across an online edition of an ancient Jewish Encyclopedia, the contents of which began to fascinate me more and more as I read about various ancient Jewish traditions, customs and festivals. I kid you not: the hair on the back of my head stood erect as I realized in a way I'd never done before, the true significance of so many of the things that Our Lord said and did during His Passion. Below is a link to the paper I wrote/compiled. I'll be the first to admit that it's a little obtuse, but I hope one day to find an accomplished writer who might use it as a base to write a proper book or movie script or something. There's so much real drama in there just waiting to be told.

      Here are a couple of tidbits from the paper to whet your appetite. Hopefully, they demonstrate what I've said about the literalness of so many of Christ's words and actions.

      1. During Passover, the night before the sacrifice was known as the "Night of Watching". (This, and much of the rest, is straight out of the Jewish Encyclopedia). It was so called because some of the family members would sit up and watch their lamb overnight, in case an enemy came and injured it - a blemished lamb would not be acceptable for sacrifice.

      Now consider: At Gethsemane, Jesus says to His disciples: "Could you not keep watch for an hour with me?" Think about the unblemished Lamb that was to be sacrificed the next day.

      2. The bread (mazzah) used during Passover and other Jewish religious festivals was pierced during baking to ensure it would not rise (like leavened bread - leaven being a symbol of pride/sin). It was also baked on a grill, resulting in stripes on the bread (this was to remind Jews of the stripes/lashes they'd received in captivity). Google for an image of mazzah and you'll see what I mean.

      Then consider Isaiah 53:5: "But he was pierced for our transgressions ... the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed."

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    2. THE PASSION OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST
      (Part 2 of 2)

      3. On the Day of Atonement two goats were presented before the High Priest. At the Eastern (nikanor) gate, the High Priest drew lots from a lottery box over two goats. One was selected “for the Lord,” and the other was designated “for Azazel” (the devil/god of death). The High Priest sacrificed the goat chosen for the Lord. He then tied a scarlet band around the horns of the goat chosen for Azazel. It was then chased away into the wilderness, to “take away the sins of the world”. As the goat made its way towards the wilderness of Mount Azazel, the women (who were not directly involved in the sacrificial ceremonies) stood by the roadside to watch its progress. Some of the people would pull the goat's hairs/beard (to make it run faster).

      Now consider:

      Matthew 27:28 And stripping him, they put a scarlet cloak about him.

      Luke 23:27-31 A great number of the people followed him, and among them were women who were beating their breasts and wailing for him.

      Isaiah 50:6: I have given my body to the strikers, and my cheeks to them that pull out the beard.

      John 1:29: The next day John saw Jesus coming toward him and said, "Look, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!"

      4. While the lambs for Passover (there were thousands) were being slaughtered in the the Temple, the families who'd brought them waited in the courtyard to get them back for the Feast. The slaughter occurred between noon and 3 pm. Then the High Priest would appear on the rampart of the temple, blow a shofar (an animal horn) and cry out in a loud voice to the crowd: "It is finished!"

      5. Jews have a custom of mourning their dead, called the ker'iah. According to the Talmud, keri'ah should be done at the moment of death.At the death of one of the seven relatives for whom mourning is decreed (father, mother, children at least 30 days old, brother or half-brother, sister or half-sister, husband, wife), a rent, at least four inches long, is made in the lapel of an outer garment of the mourner. The halachic requirement to "expose the heart" (that is, that the tear in the clothing of the deceased person's parent must be over the heart), indicates a torn heart. The apparel should be torn vertically (from top to bottom), beginning near the neck and cut down approximately three inches. The initial cut may be made with a knife (by anyone close by), but then should be torn by hand by the mourner himself. The tear should not be made along a seam, as it must appear to be a purposeful scar in the clothing, and not merely an accidental unthreading.

      Now consider:

      Matthew 27:52 And behold the veil of the temple was rent in two from the top even to the bottom, and the earth quaked, and the rocks were rent.

      Someone had rent the "outer garment" that had always clothed Him in His sanctuary, the moment His only beloved Jewish Son died!

      Food for thought? For me, "sometimes it causes me to tremble, tremble, tremble!"

      For more, download:
      http://www.4shared.com/office/jAQXbBM3/The_Passion_of_Our_Lord_Jesus_.html

      I'd better quit now, while I’m ahead - before our ever-patient Leila loses it and kills me for posting all this off-topic stuff! :)

      Delete

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