Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Habemus Papam! Francis!



Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina, a Jesuit, becomes the first pope from the Americas! Many blessings, dear Papa!

AP/FoxNews

This was a total shock to me. I had no idea who he was! But the more I learn, the more I love Pope Francis. Faithful, humble, intellectual, a theologian (with a master's in chemistry), openly rebuked by his nation's president for speaking out against sexual sins and homosexual public policy agendas. Preferential treatment for the poor. Personal comfort to AIDS patients. Wishes to evangelize Rome! Seems Marian in his devotions, annoys the dissenting Jesuits. Warm and gentle smile. Looks a bit like Pope Pius XII, no?

My heart overflows with joy for our new Pontiff.

May God protect and guide him.

I welcome your thoughts on our new pope, Francis, as we all get to know him!






.

64 comments:

  1. I was shocked too! But I love him already! God bless, Pope Francis I!

    ReplyDelete
  2. From his Wiki page:

    Homosexuality

    He has affirmed church teaching on homosexuality, including that men and women who have deep-seated homosexual tendencies must be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity and that every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided.[13] He strongly opposed legislation introduced in 2010 by the Argentine Government to allow same-sex marriage, calling it a "real and dire anthropological throwback".[14] In a letter to the monasteries of Buenos Aires, he wrote: "Let's not be naive, we're not talking about a simple political battle; it is a destructive pretension against the plan of God. We are not talking about a mere bill, but rather a machination of the Father of Lies that seeks to confuse and deceive the children of God."[15] He has also insisted that adoption by gay and lesbian people is a form of discrimination against children. This position received a rebuke from Argentine president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, who said the church's tone was reminiscent of "medieval times and the Inquisition".[16]


    This is important for us to know about him at this moment in history, where the family is under attack at its foundations. He gets it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm excited! He seems great!! Seems much younger than 76.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I can't wait to learn more about this gentle, holy man!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I remembered him from 2005, but thought he was too old to really be considered.

    I'm so excited!

    ReplyDelete
  6. From the look on his face as he stepped out, I think he was just as shocked as the rest of us! I know this doesn't mean much...but I think he really looks the part, appears to be a gentle soul, and such a soothing voice. I couldn't understand anything he was saying, but it was very comforting! I'm hoping this will help bring many members of the Society of Jesus back around. There seems to be a bit of a shadow surrounding the Jesuit name...maybe it's just that so many Jesuit universities here in the USA have taken such heterodox positions...I don't know, maybe I'm way out of line.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm so excited! It's funny, because a few hours ago I'd never heard of him, but now it feels like it never could have been anyone else!

    And the more I learn the more I love him!

    ReplyDelete
  8. There's something about him I loved as soon as he stepped out on the balcony. I'm so excited about him - am happy to read all the info coming out on him and I love the name he chose!

    ReplyDelete
  9. You know, I had wondered why there was never a Pope Francis before now. I'm so excited to learn more about him and to see where he will lead us. I'm also nervous for him, because he is about to be subjected to a lot of hate and ridicule. Praying for him and our holy mother, the Church!

    ReplyDelete
  10. It might be my hormones; however, my eyes were filled with tears of joy. So happy.

    On a side note, we don't have cable so I had to watch the coverage on ABC, the coverage was laughable. I had to mute the tv.

    ReplyDelete
  11. From Archbishop Charles Chaput:

    I first met our new Holy Father at Rome's 1997 Synod for America, and still have a gift from him, a portrait of Mary, the mother of Jesus, on my desk.

    Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Bergoglio, is a man from the new heartland of the global Church; a priest of extraordinary intellectual and cultural strengths; a man deeply engaged in the issues of contemporary life and able to speak to the modern heart; open to the new realities the Church faces; and rooted in a deep love of Jesus Christ. He is a wonderful choice; a pastor God sends not just to the Church but to every person of good will who honestly yearns for justice, peace and human dignity in our time. May God grant him courage and joy, and sustain him with his divine presence.

    ReplyDelete
  12. LJP, I went to a Jesuit college. You are not out of line. I think many Jesuits do not like this papal choice, and that is a good thing! :)

    Amen to all these great comments!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Now, remember, folks: we have a new narrative. Anyone who objects to Catholic teaching is just raaaaaaaaaaaaaacist against Argentinians. ;)

    The more I learn about Pope Francis, the more I love him!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I was actually in tears, so moved was I. His name Francis is truely inspired, I think, what an amazing Holy Father he will be. I thought he already looked like a pope, gentle, kind and wise.
    I am very happy!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Just read that our Pope has one lung! That is one tough man!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Loved how he came out, looking shy and timid! Sooo not politically savvy by worldly standards. Love him already!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I, too, am falling more and more in love as I read more and more about him.

    I think my favourite thing so far about him is that no longer can someone argue that you cannot uphold Catholic social teaching on marriage and life AND care for the poor. Our pope kind of disproves that.

    From a friend of a friend Maine: "It's like each Pope is trying to outdo the previous Pope's humility." Br. Tyler

    ReplyDelete
  18. Praise God! *standing, clapping, air horn*

    ReplyDelete
  19. I read somewhere that he had been shunned by his fellow Jesuits for some of his conservative theology (check!) and was basically relegated to teaching chemistry in a school when JPII basically rescued him and made him into a cardinal. :)

    ReplyDelete
  20. Agree, agree, agree

    Loved his dismissal: "See you soon, good bye and good rest"

    ReplyDelete
  21. Super conservative: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=3RJK0yULkCY#!

    ReplyDelete
  22. I loved about him that, in his first public appearance, he prayed a simple and touching Our Father and Hail Mary with all the people that were following the election in St Peter Square or in news coverage. I bet that in the midst of many theological debates, many heard these beautiful prayers for the first time since childhood. God Bless you Pope Francis!! <3

    ReplyDelete
  23. Super conservative? More like super CATHOLIC!

    Woohoo!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Andre, what is your point? Do you think he is a liturgist and that he planned that liturgy and dance? Clarify for me. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Amazing and wonderful. Been reading some interesting prophecies. I am not an end times girl, but I heard of a prophecy last week predicting the new Pope would take a new name, and that he would come from the heart of Mary. That he would bring in the end of the age and that all hell will now break lose against the church as the father of lies didn't see this one coming. Brilliant. If it's true ... bring it on!!

    Welcome Pope Francis!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Liz, I love that the Pope himself was very open about using the term "Father of Lies" when talking about the policy issues in his own nation! He gets the spiritual battle we are fighting.

    And, I changed the post from "Francis I" to just "Francis" as it was only John Paul I (yes, the First) who used a "I" in his name. Usually that is not done, and on the Vatican website it is just Francis. :)

    ReplyDelete
  27. Ahhh I need to find time to read and learn about him and I know absolutely NOTHING about Jesuits. With two little ones at home and VERY protestant family members staying at our house, I keep sneaking away to read little tidbits.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Our great new Pope. He's just all Francis. Humble/Tough/True Servants heart: Assisi
    Engaging/ Truth Defender / Marian: De Sales
    Evangelize Pagan world/ scientist: Xavier
    God Bless him and give him strength.

    ReplyDelete
  29. When he came out for the first time, he looked overwhelmed. I loved his simple humility. I'm already in love with our new Pope!

    ReplyDelete
  30. Nora, I just read your comment. I wish I had thought to mute the TV! We don't have cable either. Oh, the coverage was horrible. Almost ruined the happy moment. Almost.

    ReplyDelete
  31. He DOES look like Pope Pius, that's why I felt like he looked familiar!

    SO excited. :)

    ReplyDelete
  32. Yay! Yay! What does "Habemus Papam!" mean? Does it mean we have a pope? Help, I never studied Latin. I encouraged by the fact that was criticized by the president of his country.

    Now, are those people going to stop blowing pink smoke?

    ReplyDelete
  33. Lena, yes, "We have a pope!" :)

    And, I am sure glad I managed to TOTALLY avoid the pink smoke, ha ha!

    ReplyDelete
  34. I am excited for the new Holy Father as well. I must admit that I am sorely dismayed by the secular media focus, though I won't say I am disappointed. Their inability to fairly report on this momentous event is indicative of their strong liberal bias. Another thing that has bothered me is that some self-proclaimed "traditionalists" I know have bemoaned the election of Pope Francis, since he apparently has not adequately implemented the teachings of Summorum Pontificium (pardon the spelling). Why must liberal groups and ultra-conservative groups complain? I am just so happy we have a faithful, orthodox Pope, who seems like he will lead the Church with prayer and humility. Ad multos annos!

    ReplyDelete
  35. Elizabeth, totally agreed, on both counts!!

    ReplyDelete
  36. I am super excited! Such a great name, has love for the Eastern Rite of Catholicism, and seems very humble and holy. His diocesan priests love him from what I have read. I think we will have many men entering seminaries across the world during this Pontificate. I will blog on this soon. The Holy Spirit did a great job on the divine level while the Cardinals did their job on the human level.

    We also know he is a good choice because the Boo Birds are already out. Cursing and leaving nasty comments on Twitter accounts. We must pray for these lost souls. So much anger in the world. It's really a shame.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Oh gosh, so many thoughts! My heart sank at first when I heard he was a Jesuit - those previously glorious defenders of the faith and the papacy specifically, great intellectuals and evangelizers, who have turned in such great numbers against Catholic teaching and the Popes from the 1950s onwards, in violation of their vow of fealty and their beautiful motto AMDG Ad Maiorem Dei Gloriam (For the Greater Glory of God). It sank further when I heard his biographer say (on the BBC, I think) that he was a "moderate" who deliberately kept a low profile under Benedict XVI in order not to upset him. And the fact that he apparently was the runner up in the 2005 conclave, and could thus be considered representative of the anti-Ratzinger faction (my inference).

    But then my spirits began to lift: A prominent dissenting priest in my country who leads about a third of priests in rebellion against celibacy, women's ordination, communion for the divorced who remarried etc. seemed not too thrilled on live TV - good news! Pope Francis' vocal opposition to gay marriage and adoption of children by gay couples, and against abortion and birth control, to the point of angering the Argentine government - good! The name he chose and what it represents, considering also what the various Saint Francis' did for the Church (thanks Chris!) - beautiful. The fact that Pope Benedict apparently holds a special affection for him - excellent! His humility coupled with intellectual firepower - a perfect continuation of Pope Benedict and just what the Church needs in these times!

    In the end, we must have faith in the Holy Spirit rightly guiding the cardinals, and their being faithful to the vows they make before each ballot. Leila's quote of Pope Benedict in her previous post was so spot on. Thank you again.

    ReplyDelete
  38. @ Andre: Have you seen Catholic Masses celebrated in Africa? Full of joy, dancing and singing, thus expressing their love for Christ - brings tears to my eyes every time I have the privilege to attend (it's been a long time now). And then you have, at the "opposite end", the Tridentine Mass, which expresses that same joy and reverence in a completely different way. As JoAnna said - Catholic! It's one of the innumerable things we love about our Church, which expresses its universality and yet complete coherence.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Hello All, long time reader but first time poster. My thoughts on our new Pope: I love him. I felt a bone tingling chill and then an overwhelming sense of calm after he was announced. The Holy Spirit truly working.

    St. Francis began his ministry when he heard God speak to him, "Francis, re-build my Church". Love it.

    Love the seagull perched on the chimney before the white smoke. If you research seagulls, you will learn they are a very intelligent bird, have complex social structures, and will ward off predators. In Lore and Mythology, seagulls will travel between earth the heaven world as messengers bringing messages to mortals. How fitting.

    Great day yesterday! The Church is in good hands! I love being Catholic! Life is good!

    ReplyDelete
  40. I did read that he is "for" contraception to prevent disease. Not sure if this was taken out of context, but it surprised me. Then I read other places where he clearly was against giving Argentinans free contraceptives, so I have a feeling somewhere he was misquoted. Anyone else hear of this about him?

    DD

    ReplyDelete
  41. DD - I think is actually a reference to something Pope Benedict sais that was widely taken out of context. I just got finished reading a lovely anti-Catholic piece in the New Yorker that referenced this B16 quote (inaccurately of course) but did not attribute anything to Francis (and if Pope Francis had said anything remotely similar, I'd think they'd be all over that).

    ReplyDelete
  42. wow can you tell I was typing with a squirmy baby on my lap lol!! Sorry. But yeah, at most Pope Francis might have shown support for B16's comment that was out of context.

    ReplyDelete
  43. I have to be perfectly honest. I was happy and grateful when our Holy Father was first announced, but somehow apprehensive. Jesuit? As in, Georgetown? So I was thrown a bit by that. And while I know his love of the poor is impressive, right away I started hearing the phrase "preferential option for the poor", which is sometimes associated with treating the Church as though its primary mission is to be the world's social workers, when love of Christ has to be primary, and has to infuse all of our actions for the poor. I know, St. Francis himself said to preach the gospel and if necessary, use words, so we don't have to vocally evangelize all the time, but there should be no doubt in anyone's mind what is motivating our love and concern for the poor and suffering. Maybe what made me a little apprehensive, too, is I wondered if this would signal a turn away from the new evangelization.

    But - this morning when I said my rosary and it came to the first Our Father and three Hail Marys, I teared up when I said, "For the Holy Father, Pope Francis" for the first time. And then I came home and saw that he brought flowers for the Blessed Mother this morning at the Basilica of St. Mary Major. He is placing the Church in the best of hands, and I think there will be many surprises for us as we get to know our new Holy Father better. And I do love St. Francis! My son's high school is named for him and St. Francis is that son's Confirmation patron. Such a wonderful name for our Holy Father!

    ReplyDelete
  44. I love him already, Leila. How can you not love a humble, conservative Jesuit (which I thought was an oxymoron until now)? If you don't already like him, check out this poignant picture on http://8kidsandabusiness.wordpress.com/2013/03/13/servant-of-the-servants-of-god/

    ReplyDelete
  45. Morning, everyone!! Yes, I think all of our hearts sunk a little when we first heard he was a Jesuit (I went to Boston College, my sister went to Santa Clara, and the stories could make your hair curl), but then I remembered that when the Jesuits are faithful (Fessio, Hardon), they are SOLID.

    Sebastian, you are so right about the different liturgical characteristics in different cultures. The Native Americans here, the Africans in Africa, and South America has its own culture. So, Andre is trying to "find" something to tweak us, I fear. ;) Not gonna work. Find something a little more substantive and significant, Andre. :)

    Tonka, welcome! So glad you came out of lurkdom! Stay? :)

    Sarah, you are right. I wrote about that media-made condom debacle, here:

    http://littlecatholicbubble.blogspot.com/2010/11/pope-and-condoms.html

    Sharon, so happy that this pope is Marian! It is hard to be a dissident and have a true devotion to Mary, if you know what I mean. Very wonderful! I expect to learn SO much from this Pope. Our American notion of the poor and what that means is so vastly different from the rest of the world, and I need to expand my understanding of these issues. South America is not like the USA. I need his wisdom, his insights.

    One clarifying point that I may need to hammer home a lot (and you all should to), St. Francis never said, "Preach the gospel always and when necessary use words." Brandon Vogt's head is exploding now that people are using that, ha ha! It has been used too often to excuse inaction and silence by Catholics who don't want to speak up or defend the faith or evangelize. I used to use it myself, but it always bothered me on some level. When I realized St. Francis never said it, I was relieved. We cannot hide behind that now, and we must speak the Word and the Truth as well as also living it. :)

    Anabelle, that picture is just breathtaking.

    ReplyDelete
  46. An interesting point I heard today regarding Pope Francis is that his native tongue is an international language (Spanish) unlike Polish or German in the popes before him. This will be a good thing, in that Pope Francis' thoughts and words will be immediately understood by millions, straight from the heart, before translation. Thought that was interesting, anyway.

    Another point, I see a lot of people leaving comments on other sites, all lathered up about the liturgical practices they fear Pope Francis will dismantle or ruin. How about we sit back and let the man be Pope a while before we run crazy with 'the sky is falling'? How about we pray for him in his new mission?

    ReplyDelete
  47. Nubby, bingo!!

    And, I love Larry D's take on the "sky is falling" types:

    http://actsoftheapostasy.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/his-holiness-pope-francis/

    ReplyDelete
  48. Love him already - so so happy!

    ReplyDelete
  49. Just a quick question: Why are Jesuits perceived as liberal?

    ReplyDelete
  50. A little interesting thing

    http://www.dailydot.com/society/pope-francis-dream-came-true/

    ReplyDelete
  51. Leila, thanks for the correction on the quote!

    After seeing articles about Pope Francis's first day, I find him very interesting. He is continuing his habit of avoiding special attention and extra expense. It reminds me of stories about Pope St. Pius X, who always wanted to give everything to the poor. Francis has even asked his bishops, priests and nuns in Argentina to give money to the poor instead of spending it to come to Rome. You've probably seen the cute picture of him even checking out of his hotel and paying his own bill! One copy of that photo on FB makes it look as if the hotel clerk can't find his bill and he says, Oh, I checked in under another name. Maybe you're the one who posted that, Leila, I don't remember! I wonder if that will continue, and how it will come across. I don't mind pomp surrounding the pope - he is a BIG DEAL, not because of himself but because of his position. But if he wants to be more subdued, well he is being himself, and that will be a different thing to experience. He is not subdued in his seriousness toward the faith, from the sound of his first homily! May God bless him and Mary keep him protected in her mantle.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Chris, sorry that your link to the twitter story was caught in spam for a time!

    As for the Jesuits, they have a reputation since after Vatican II for being notoriously dissident. They are (not all, but a lot) rebellious on doctrine. They are intellectuals (thus all the schools and universities), but many have "thought" their way right out of the Church in a sense…. Instead of obedience to the Church (their sacred oath), they seem to view the Church and her teachings as a bit too pedestrian and quaint (medieval?) for their liking. There are still some faithful Jesuits of course (think of Fr. Fessio, Fr. Hardon (RIP)), but lately Jesuits and Jesuit institutions have deviated greatly from fidelity to the Magisterium.

    Many of the Jesuit universities (Boston College where I went [and where everyone I know lost his or her faith], Georgetown, Fordham, Santa Clara, and more) appear to be Catholic in name only. I would never in a million years want my child in a Jesuit school, frankly, except to go in as a missionary!

    The Jesuits are known for their "social justice" stance, but not so much for caring about the truth and meaning of human sexuality, for example, or the tenets of the Creed. I am not sure I heard much about piety, obedience, sin, the truth of the resurrection of Christ, Marian devotion, etc. from the Jesuit community in general.

    My nephew arrived at a Jesuit campus this year and is shellshocked at the lack of belief and piety. Again, there are very devout Jesuits, so don't get me wrong, but they are few and far between. There is a hope that Pope Francis might be able to "clean house" in his own order. Clearly, he is a Jesuit that is faithful to his vows and his order's founder. :)

    ReplyDelete
  53. Sharon, that is going to be the interesting part! He is not into the "trappings" of the papacy (even though all of that is about the office, more than the man), but I believe that is a personal comfort level, rather than a judgment or condemnation of such things. He will be a different facet of Peter than others have been. JPII and Benedict were teachers exactly when we needed them, and now Francis will show us how to live that teaching out in the streets of the world, so to speak. I love that God made each of us unique, with unique gifts, and expects us to use them for his glory and the salvation of souls. I see all our popes doing exactly that, and never losing their individuality. I am giddy with excitement to see what this papacy holds!

    ReplyDelete
  54. I love the fact that he sneaks out and rides the bus around Rome instead of taking a motorcade. It's the kind of thing you always daydream that you'd do if you were president or something (at least I do) but none of them ever actually do it. He also seems to speak very frankly (unplanned pun) about things like the "Father of Lies" where most people would use more political language, and that too is something I always wish a leader would do.

    On a related note: I bet Joe Biden is going to take a 20-car motorcade and dozens of attendants when he goes to Rome for the inaugural Mass... what a contrast that'll make.

    ReplyDelete
  55. Joe, I also noted and loved the "Father of Lies" statement! I knew then that all was well. :)

    ReplyDelete
  56. My heart did not sink when I heard he was a Jesuit! I attended a Jesuit university (graduating with my MA in 2009) and I worked in the Jesuit residence as a receptionist. Nearly ALL of the young (35 and under) Jesuits I knew were holy people who love the Church and defend her. I know there are many Jesuits who have not done so in the last 50 years, but if my experience with this new crop of seminarians and priests is any indication, the order is experiencing a change! In fact, there was a group of about 10 Jesuit scholastics who attended the TLM parish that my husband and I did while I was in grad school. Many many very good men coming through now.

    As for Papa Francis, when someone described him as a "deeply humble, doctrinally orthodox, champion of social justice" I was hooked. I love it.

    ReplyDelete
  57. SarahLee, that is wonderful! I am thrilled that the younger Jesuits are around and kicking (along with the much older ones)! I guess it's too many in that middle group that give the rest of them a bad name! I sense a great renewal in the order now. Those young, holy, faithful Jesuits and seminarians must be beside themselves with joy. :)

    ReplyDelete
  58. It's really a shame we have to label priests as being orthodox, liberal, conservative, etc. I have used the term orthodox and such when referring to priests for many years. I have recently tried to pull back on using such labels, because I am never completely sure who my audience is. When I am talking to good knowledgeable Catholics, they understand those terms. If I am speaking to a non-Catholic or a Catholic who may not understand their faith as much, I could create some misunderstandings. The job of a priest is to subject themselves to the will of the Church and to be obedient. If I'm not careful, I could be misleading somebody to believe it is okay for there be these different types of priests and as a priest they have their choice or have been empowered to use their own interpretations.

    Sadly, there are priests who are not 100% in sync with the Church and that is why we use the labels we do. We just have to be careful to not create additional misunderstandings.

    I was once told by a priest that if you ever want the answer to something on Catholicism to never ask a priest, because a better source would be the Catechism of the Church. I thought that was interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  59. I agree. Some people, when I say, "Such and such is a good, orthodox priest" think I am saying he is a priest in the Orthodox Church. Oops!

    ReplyDelete
  60. My liberal atheist sister sent me an email of congratulations almost immediately after his election and said it was exciting even for her! She likes that he took the bus. It would be great if he was the one that helped open that door to faith for her. I can only pray.

    My reaction was similar to what most said here, "Huh?" but then soon followed by great joy and I am thrilled! I know the Holy Spirit is behind all of this. The fact that most of us didn't know who he was and that there was little mention of him before the conclave is even more a testament to that.

    ReplyDelete
  61. Question: Is "papa" a term of affection or does it literally mean "pope" in another language? Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  62. Johanne, great question! I always assumed it literally meant "papa" -- and I think I am correct, except that I mixed up the order. This etymological analysis says that the word "papa" came from the word "pope"! (Tell me if you think I am reading this wrong:

    pope (n.)
    Old English papa (9c.), from Church Latin papa "bishop, pope" (in classical Latin, "tutor"), from Greek papas "patriarch, bishop," originally "father." Applied to bishops of Asia Minor and taken as a title by the Bishop of Alexandria c.250. In Western Church, applied especially to the Bishop of Rome since the time of Leo the Great (440-461) and claimed exclusively by them from 1073 (usually in English with a capital P-).

    http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pope

    Johanne, as a non-Catholic, I'd love your thoughts on our new Holy Father! What are your impressions? Did you have interest in the conclave as it went on? Let us know! I am very interested in the non-Catholic take on this whole thing. :)

    ReplyDelete
  63. In our family, we read about all the papabile and guessed who would be pope. My 10 year old, who wins everything, guessed Bergoglio.

    I'm glad to hear the younger Jesuits are following the Church. We recently read a book about St. Isaac Jogues. With Pope Francis following on this so closely, my boys are talking about becoming Jesuits when they grow up.

    And as long as Leila doesn't mind my linking to my posts, I'm going to do it again. Let me know if you get tired of it! :) I wrote a biography of the new pope for kids and related teaching ideas at
    http://contemplativehomeschool.wordpress.com/2013/03/19/meet-pope-francis-for-kids-and-their-parents/

    ReplyDelete

PLEASE, when commenting, do not hit "reply" (which is the thread option). Instead, please put your comment at the bottom of the others.

To ensure that you don't miss any comments, click the "subscribe by email" link, above. If you do not subscribe and a post exceeds 200 comments, you must hit "load more" to get to the rest. We often have meaty and long discussions -- trust me, they're worth following!